Brake Bleeding

Discussion in 'LR3' started by Rogo, Jun 11, 2010.

  1. Rogo

    Rogo Full Access Member

    Posts:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Has anyone bled their brakes?

    Anyone have experience with the Castrol GTLMA that Atlantic British sells?

    How much fluid capacity does the brake system have?

    Thanks! :biggrin:
     
  2. kwlr3

    kwlr3 Full Access Member

    Posts:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2005
    I just bled my brakes at 75,000 miles and used the Castrol LMA. The pedal was firmer afterwards. It doesn't take much fluid, the quart of LMA is enough to do 3 or 4 vehicles. The whole thing can be done without taking off the wheels, just raise the suspension.
     
  3. Disco Mike

    Disco Mike Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Now to give you a little more accurate information.
    Yes that fluid is good, but no since paying that much plus freight when you can buy Vavoline's synthetic DOT 3/4 at your local parts store for less and no shipping. You need 2 quarts cause you don't want to just go thru the motions of changing a little fluid but do it right which will "ALWAYS" take at least 3 plus pints to bleed each wheel till the fluid coming out is crystal clear starting with the r/r then the l/r, r/f the l/f.
    If you don't use that much fluid and don't follow the proper sequence you ar just wasting your time.
     
  4. Mhaise57

    Mhaise57 Full Access Member

    Posts:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2009
    Correct me if I am wrong, but I am pretty sure that the LR3's breaking system is quite a bit different from the D1 and D2.
     
  5. e24kgold

    e24kgold Full Access Member

    Posts:
    319
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    it is quite a bit different. Once again Mike is polluting the LR3 forum :mad: Mike the discovery forum called, you're due back by 5...:hello:
     
  6. Rogo

    Rogo Full Access Member

    Posts:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Mike, please be careful what forum you are posting in. This is not the first time - I would hate for misinformation to live on this forum for someone to stumble upon later. I cannot confirm that the Valvoline meets the LR3 specs. I went to a local auto parts store and it did not specify ISO 4925 class 6. The Castrol meets this spec.

    In terms of paying for shipping - I am getting my rotors at the local dealership for a good price with our club discount. It beats shipping those heavy items any day. I will investigate costs for the LR branded brake fluid versus the Castrol shipped.
     
  7. Disco Mike

    Disco Mike Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Well, I am getting jumped on before any of you have read the spec.s of both the Vavoline and Castrol system synthetic DOT 3 or 4 fluids.
    Hers is what I just pulled of line for Castrol,
    "Perfect size for topping off your brake fluid level! (12 oz.)

    Provides Superior Synthetic Lubrication for Anti-Lock Braking Systems (ABS).

    Recommended for all U.S. and foreign vehicles with DOT 3 and DOT 4 requirements, including Land Rover and BMW.

    Exceeds DOT 3 and DOT 4 requirements.
    Unique Low Moisture Activity (LMA) formulation provides maximum protection against vapor lock brake failure.
    Synthetic formulation maintains a higher boiling point than conventional brake fluids.
    Superior protection against chloride and zinc corrosion of braking system parts.
    Ideally suited for Land Rover and BMW / MINI Cooper vehicles as well as Audi, Jaguar, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Saab, Volkswagen, Volvo, Honda, Acura, and many other brake systems.
    Exceeds specifications SAE 1703, SAE 1704, ISO 4925, JIS K2233 and FMVSS No. 116 DOT 3 and DOT 4. "
    Same thing as what Vavoline states.
    So, let's don't be so quick to try and make someone be wrong.
     
  8. Rogo

    Rogo Full Access Member

    Posts:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Can you provide a link or a quote from Valvoline specs? Specifically the ISO 4925?
     
  9. Mr.BigsLR3

    Mr.BigsLR3 Full Access Member

    Posts:
    313
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2009
    Wow. I have never seen a more pathetic bunch. Uh folks...if the fluid meets the OE DOT requirements, the ability to resist water, and temps, then it is fine.

    Braking (this is how it's spelled BTW), systems are generally the same basic ABS assisted hydraulic systems that have been in use in the auto industry for the past few decades. In my Porsches, I would regularly (and on purpose) swap the existing OE fluid with one with a better temp rating. Mostly for on-track conditions and high spirited fun.

    It is not the braking system that is the compatibility problem, it's the fluids IN the system. Meaning - The fluid MUST be consistent in the whole system for it to work properly. Many fluids have different temp and moisture ratings. This means, never mix different brand fluids. Not all fluids are compatible with each other. Example - Motul 600 has a much higher temp rating and material compound than ATE Super Gold. The Motul will also attract more moisture than the ATE. as a result we were required to flush the Motul system more often.

    Simply put - if you have the Castrol in the system, and the fluid is ok, do a bleed with the Castrol. If your rig is ready for a full flush, do what you like as long as it is a complete flush with the correct fluid rated for your vehicle (DOT and TEMP).

    Please...enough with the BS.

    With regards to Mike, the guy is a 30+ year service expert. I am damn sure he knows more than most about what works and what does not.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  10. Rogo

    Rogo Full Access Member

    Posts:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    I have a friend who owns his own shop. He's been in business for 20 years. I have taken cars to him for a long time and trust him explicitly to do work on my cars. But I will not have him work on my Land Rovers. Aside from the fact that I enjoy working on my trucks, he doesn't know jack about them.

    Mike's 30 years of experience is invaluable and I don't want to disparage. However, his experience with the LR3 is very limited. It is significantly different from a D1 or a D2. I know. I've worked on both. I won't say for a minute that I know as much as Mike does, but I know enough to say that the D2 and LR3 are very different.

    That being said - this isn't BS. Can you tell me what the ISO 4925 spec says and why its acceptable to ignore it?
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010

Share This Page