Brake replacement

Discussion in 'LR3' started by meanc, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. m5ccie

    m5ccie Well-Known Member

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    Thank you.
     
  2. acsubie

    acsubie Active Member

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    anyone know where i can find a step by step (prefer with pics) of how to replace the brake pads?
     
  3. mustbeaudi

    mustbeaudi Full Access Member

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    brake pad replacement instructions

    I know I have posted this before, but I'll try again here. First:
    Pads - between $85 (Wagner) and $65 (after Monroe's rebate) for both sets, front and rear, commonly available.
    Rotors if needed, might be cheaper at dealer (I can offer a parts discount at your local store) but from $60 to $80 each rotor on Atlantic British site. Need depends upon wear, condition.
    Finally, brake sensors list for about $20 each, one per axle, if needed (open, triggered).

    None of the following is of my authorship, I gleaned it from LR3 sites like this!

    SPECS
    Wheel Nuts - 140 Nm (103 lb.ft).
    Anchor Plate Bolts - 115 Nm (85 lb.ft)
    Guide Pin Bolts - 32 Nm (24 lb.ft)`
    Brake Disc Retaining Screw (Torx) - 35 Nm (26 lb.ft)
    Brake Hose Retaining Bracket - 25 Nm (18 lb.ft)
    Front Brake Hose Union to Caliper - 32 Nm (24 lb.ft)
    Rear Brake Hose Union to Caliper - 28 Nm (21 lb.ft)
    Bleed Screw - 14 Nm (10 lb.ft)

    Front - Brake disc thickness - NEW 27 mm, Service Limit = 24 mm
    Rear - Brake disc thickness, NEW = 20.0 mm (0.78 in), Service limit = 17.0 mm (0.67 in)
    Disc Run Out - must not exceed 0.3 mm
    Pad minimum thickness 3.0 mm (0.12 in)

    REAR
    Disc diameter on Tdv6 325mm
    Thickness new 20mm
    Minimum Thickness 17mm
    Run out 0.3mm
    Pad Min thickness 3.0mm

    FRONT
    Disc diameter Tdv6 320mm
    Thickness New 30mm
    Minimum Thickness 27mm
    Run Out 0.3mm
    Min Pad Thickness 3.0mm

    Make sure you put the wear sensor onto the left hand side inner pad. The wear sensor has a small brass contact spring that fits around it. This was stuck into my old brake pad, and could easily get lost so make sure you retrieve it.

    How the hell do you get the sensor cable to plug back in to where it belongs? I got the old one off without a problem, and routing the new one was not even too much trouble, since there is no liner at the rear. However, the cable plugs in behind the air suspension, which makes it very difficult to see what's going on. I presume it's simple when they're built, since the body's probably not on when the cable is fitted, but taking it off to change it later seems a bit extreme!

    Anyway, I found that you can get the socket (the part "on the car") to a visible position, but I still can't get the plug (on the end of the new cable) to click into position correctly. Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

    Best to undo inner skin clips and follow wire up to the connector...now using your 3rd hand...I think you get the picture....try and release the old connector (all by feel) and attach the new one..
    It is a complete pain to connect up in the wheel arch. Best advice is study the new one to work out how the old one comes out!
    As I pulled mine off the disc pad I broke the (ceramic?) bit adjacent to the disc, (was replacing it anyway, so a little heavy handed) so if you are planning not to change it - pull very gently, and don't lever the angled bit.

    35 Nm (26 lb.ft) for the bolts; tighten the bleed screw to 14 Nm (10 lb.ft)

    Tools required;

    Good jack and stands, wheel brace, 13mm spanner, 15mm spanner 17mm spanner, Pliers, brake cleaner, brake grease, piston retraction tool.
    For the front, you need a 13mm and 17mm spanner wrench for the front and a 15mm spanner for the rear. The problem is that you need the wrenches to be narrow. I haven't been able to locate "spanner" wrenches at any auto supply store, so I just ground down the wrenches on a grinder. I just used a c clamp carefully to retract the pistons.
    I jacked under the beefy arm that attaches to the wheel.
    1) I found a 13mm socket to be easier than a spanner for the caliper bolts
    2) I also used the G-clamp method of getting the piston back in, but rather than messing around cutting pieces of wood, just used the spanner across the piston to stop the clamp going up inside it.

    FRONTS
    1. Securely jack the car onto axle stands and remove front wheels
    2. On the left hand side, use pliers to pull the pad wear sensor off the pad
    3. Remove the 13 mm bolts that hold the caliper to the caliper frame (use the 15mm spanner, rear, 17mm spanner front, to hold the sliding joints whilst you undo the caliper bolts)
    4. (Discard the caliper bolts IF new ones are in the kit)
    5. Lift off the caliper and support, take care not to strain the brake pipe and wires.
    6. Remove and discard the old pads. (Front and rear pads are different, Front has 2 piston system, rear has 1)
    7. (Remove and discard the pad support springs IF new ones in kit)
    8. Use piston compression tool to fully retract pistons into caliper - take care and push the pistons slowly and squarely. use a small piece of wood cut to size to hold one of the two pistons in place, as one comes out as you compress the other
    9. Clean the caliper with brake cleaner.
    10 IF included, fit the new support springs to the caliper frame
    11 Smear a little brake grease onto the back of each pad, and a little onto the sliding surface that fits into the support spring
    12 Fit the pads into the support springs (rear pads are directional chamfer goes towards the ground, ie the leading edge of disk travel for forward motion)
    13 Replace brake wear sensor, refit original or tie back if you feel you do not need it if its still intact.
    14 Replace the caliper onto the frame and use the new bolts to secure.
    15 Refit road wheel
    16 Pump brake pedal to prime the system.
    17 Check level in brake fluid reservoir
    18 Carefully road test
     
  4. meanc

    meanc Member

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    This is for the REAR

    The brake housing is attached to sliders. They have rubber folds on them like a bendy straw. Those are the ones that take the 13mm and 15mm box end wrench.

    Once you remove this you will see the caliper. It's the one that has the big round cylinder sticking out. if you look on it closely you will see a small rubber cap. Take off the cap and you will see the bleeder screw.

    Take the 7/16" box end wrench and loosen the bleed screw a couple of turns.

    Then take the C-Clamp and compress the big cylinder all the way into the housing.

    Remove the old brake pads from the housing (taking note of their orientation first) then install the new ones.

    Reattach the brake pad housing the same way you took it off and reattach the bolts.

    Then properly bleed the brake lines.


    So easy a caveman could do it.

    Have fun !!!
     
  5. m5ccie

    m5ccie Well-Known Member

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    Don't you have to do something with the air suspension before jacking the car up and remove the wheels?
     
  6. meanc

    meanc Member

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    I didnt, and everything is 100% on mine.
     
  7. drzjoint

    drzjoint Full Access Member

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    No, I put it in off road height just to make it quicker.
     
  8. uptick1028

    uptick1028 New Member

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    New pads and rotors 2006 Range Rover Sport

    Pad and Rotor installation on 2006 Range Rover Sport

    Fronts:

    Used 13mm socket on caliper bolts and a slender 17mm open wrench to hold glide pin from turning as I removed. I had to go out and purchase a new more slender 17mm open ended wrench as my Craftsman was just a hair to wide to fit in the narrow opening. I noticed some on this board said they had to use a breaker bar, but mine were fairly easy to remove.

    Next onto the caliper mounting bracket , which has to be removed before the rotor. The size on the front caliper mount bolts was 21mm. Make sure you use a 21mm twelve point socket on these. I found these more difficult to remove. Hit them with some CRC Freeze Off and still at first could not budge. Then went to a longer breaker bar 18" and got them off. (Note---may have to remove cable guide held in with 10mm screw, just behind caliper and detach sensor cable and ABS wires from surrounding guides to get at the mounting bracket bolts...a good idea to do this before you remove caliper anyway as it gives you more room to hang the caliper from the chasis or place it on a box or milk crate as to not strain the lines.)

    Next removing Torx screw from rotor...on my Range Rover Sport a Torx screw holds the rotor onto the hub..the size is a Torx #50...the first wheel I did came off easy , but on the second one I actually sheared some of the tips off my Torx socket when it slid out. A few things I would suggest for removing the Torx screw are 1. Spay liberally with CRC Freeze Off or another penetrating oil, rap on the rotor hub with a small sledge hammer around the area (but not directly on the Torx screw, and place a box or some kind of support under your ratchet or breaker bar so that you Torx drive socket does not torque out as your are trying to break the screw free. If you strip this screw out you are either going to have remove it with an extractor or try to cut a slot into with a dremel tool and then remove it with a big flat head screwdriver and a pair of channel locks.., in other words do your best not to strip it.

    After you get the rotor pretty simple...I also used this opportunity to spray paint the caliper mounts and the calipers with gloss black engine spray paint. My calipers and mounts had a rusty tinge to them so I just hit them with steel bristle attached to my hand drill and them shot them with paint. I just made sure to cover the piston area as to not get paint in there,

    Put everything back together and put wear sensor on last, after you have mounted pads and caliper back in place. As note from an earlier poster said connecting the sensor in front was a bitch (not connecting to the brake pad , but connecting the other end ) and he was correct..had to remove some of the wheel well liner pins so I could pull back liner. Than held the liner out with any item you can find to wedge in there. That way you can get a good look at where the connector snaps in at top of wheel well., After you snap it in, just re-run along old sensor path and clip to new brake pad.

    REARS....

    Pretty much same gig, except 13mm socket and 15mm open end wrench for guide pins.
    And 15 mm twelve point socket for caliper mounting bracket.
     
  9. zgrmns

    zgrmns Active Member

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    I changed the front pads on my wife's LR3 last night. Now, when I turn on the truck, I get a transmission fault, and the pedal goes all the way to the floor. I can pump the pedal and resistance builds up, but then goes to the floor again after I start moving. I'm wondering if air got into the system or something. I've changed pads before on a number of vehicles and haven't had this problem. Any advice is appreciated.
     
  10. uptick1028

    uptick1028 New Member

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    Leak

    Sounds like you have a leak in the system. Are you sure the brake line didn't break or crack when you removed the rotors. Check under the vehicle for fluid leaks, also check the master cyclinder for fluid level. Thats the only think I can think of that would cause the pedal to go to the floor after you already set the brakes.
     

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