Buying Tips for 2009-2012 HSE

Discussion in 'Buying Tips, Advice and Discussion' started by jducote, May 28, 2017.

  1. jducote

    jducote New Member

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    I am new to the site and would like to know some considerations when purchasing a pre-owned 2009-2012 HSE. Any advice is appreciated.
     
  2. BronkoZ

    BronkoZ Member

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  3. spawnywhippet

    spawnywhippet Member

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    While I am not an expert, I do my own maintenance and repairs, so my advice is aimed at the kind of person who will do their own PPI and maintenance. I would aim for the 2012+ model, which has a better 5.0 V8 from Jaguar. The earlier BMW motors often had timing chain issues by 100k miles.
    • The transmission is an expensive service. Land Rover says it has a lifetime fluid, whereas ZF who make the transmission says it should be changed at 75k miles. To do this job as per Land Rover, you need to drop the subframe, exhausts and then drop the pan with built in filter, takes many hours. Alternatively, you just drop the pan, saw off the filter neck and reinstall a BMW pan with replaceable filter. No need to drop all the subframe and exhausts and the job is much cheaper as you only need to replace the filter and fluid from then on.
    • The infotainment system runs quite slowly (at least on my 2012 HSE). Takes up to 2 seconds to respond to a command.
    • Front control arms often need doing between 50 and 70k miles.
    • Some LR4's don't have roof rack mounts, 3rd row of seats or tow pack electrics, check this carefully if you need them.
    • Check the underneath carefully for corrosion, I believe a few of the cars suffered galvanic corrosion which was extremely difficult to remove and very expensive.
    • Scan the car for codes, you will often find a lot of dormant or benign codes caused by flat batteries, so clear them, take a long drive then scan again. Especially check the timing if you have an advanced scanner.
    • Air compressor gives trouble as it gets older, look for 'filling slowly' errors. Costs $500 to DIY replace and the new part has to be coded to the VIN. Or you can buy a rebuild kit and fix the old compressor.
    • Spark plugs need replacing at 105k miles, easy DIY and genuine plugs are about $15 each.
    • Check for wet front carpets. Often the sunroof drain tubes crack or break and water ends up inside the cabin. Not difficult to fix, but can cause electrical issues if not fixed quickly.
    • Check the Carfax and maintenance records carefully for regular oil changes and work. If the car is dirty and smells inside, likely the car has not been maintained well.
     

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