$1k for Duratracks NOW vs $3k for ko2s on steel LATER

Discussion in 'LR4' started by Socialseb83, Oct 18, 2019.

  1. Socialseb83

    Socialseb83 Full Access Member

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    That’s my dilema.
    If i keep my 19” stock rims, i can get these goodyear duratracs that supposedly were released FOR the LR4, without having to change out my wheels.
    OR
    I can wait another year before being able to get the $$$$ for a set of 5 18” steel wheels with ko2s.

    are the stock wheels and durattac tires realy THAT much worse that ko2s on 18” steel?

    i’m genuinely curious because i don’t really know as much about this stuff as y’all.
     
  2. Bryan Jones

    Bryan Jones Full Access Member

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    I'm not sure about the KO2's, as I've never used them. The Duratracs are.... Decent depending on the terrain you're on. With that being said, switching to small wheels with more sidewall is always better
     
  3. avslash

    avslash Full Access Member

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    Use dictates equipment.

    Nothing wrong with Duratracs. I have heard several good comments on them.

    The criticism I have heard {secondhand} is a relatively weak sidewall that can be prone to cuts and punctures.

    I also don't think the 19" version is available in an E rating. That might be a consideration if you mod the truck as mentioned in your other thread.

    You really can't air down 19's as well. Might or might not be relevant for your uses.

    You could also consider doing 18's by going the much cheaper route of LR3 18" wheels with a 1.25 inch spacer. I ran this configuration for 45K miles before going to compomotive 18's and had zero issues. I found my LR3 wheels on craigslist, and with the spacers was into them for approximately $600.00 and a little bit of grinding time on the front calipers.

    Actually, knowing you're in Houston, as well, I will make you a great deal on 5 LR3 wheels if you want to consider that route. They have been there and done that, and they have the gouges and rock marks to prove it, but they are perfectly serviceable. My wife would love to see me cull my collection of Land Rover wheels as they have just been sitting in my attic for 2 years at this point.

    Spacers are available here, if you go that route. http://www.motorsport-tech.com/special/truck/landrover_s
     
  4. Troy Angrignon

    Troy Angrignon Full Access Member

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    @Socialseb83 since you noted in your other posts that you're going to be potentially spending money (in your stack-ranked / prioritized list of spend), and that you want to "go off-road", you're always going to be better going for a tire with more and stronger sidewall and more load capacity and puncture resistance. If all you're ever going to do is go on dirt roads, something like the Duratrac or Continental CrossContact or Bridgestone Dueler Alenza that are all Load Index 111, 50 psi, SUV tires will be more than plenty.

    But I agree with the other forum members above, if your use case dictates going on harder trails, potentially getting into some rock crawling (you mentioned sliders and front/rear bumpers in one post), then you'll be wanting 18" wheels, and beefier E-rated tires.

    In short, if you just want to look good but be a liability on the trail to yourself and others from having sidewall punctures, throw a set of Duratracs on. If you want to be useful and safe off-road, then invest first in good tires/wheels. Your use should dictate the equipment.

    1. Light-duty off-roading: 19" wheels (or bigger) with something like the Duratrac / CrossContact / Alenza. But if you have those 6 ply SUV tires, you probably don't want to be putting yourself in situations where you need sliders, bumpers, and armor.

    2. Actual base off-roader: 18" wheels with E-rated truck tires, and a shovel and maxtraxx and first aid kit in the back plus driver and first aid training.

    3. Serious off-roader: Everything in 2 above, plus bumpers, winch, roof rack, etc. Pros: Capable. Cons: Expensive.

    I think you need to be honest with yourself what you're planning on doing with the truck. There is nothing wrong with "making your truck look cool" but don't confuse that with building an off-road or overlanding vehicle.

    You mention budget constraint. You'd be better off doing the wheels and tires now and getting some driver training and then skipping the rest of the truck additions you were planning. My two cents. I'm sure others will have different opinions. Regardless, welcome to the clan and good luck with the build!
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
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  5. m_lars

    m_lars Full Access Member

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    I don’t recommend Duratracs as they have weak sidewalls, even with an E load rating. Ive owned them personally and had them on work trucks. Many people will tell you you NEED E rated tires due to the weight of the truck and the assumed sidewall strength, I disagree. Guys in the JKU world don’t run E rated tires and those pigs are just as heavy. Research tires looking for good sidewalls, you may have to go E due to limited options, but don’t get hung up on it. I’m a huge fan of the Cooper S/T Maxx, but they have no 19” sizes.
     
  6. Troy Angrignon

    Troy Angrignon Full Access Member

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    @m_lars I think you make an interesting distinction but I'm unaware of any non-E (C/D) rated tires with beefy sidewalls - are you? I too am a fan of the S/T Maxx (just bought an LT265/60R18 set for my LR4) because of the E-rating AND the sidewall strength. Interested in your idea of non-E tires that still have strong sidewalls. I didn't think such an animal existed.


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  7. djkaosone

    djkaosone '11 LR4 HSE LUX 5.0L V8

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    I have first hand experience with duratracs, I spent about $1600 for 5 duratracs on 19" wheels. They are great until you have to deflate them for any reason. The sidewalls are like butter. Even though they're XL rated for off road, they don't hold up.

    I had to drop tire pressure to bounce off of rocks while going through Johnson Valley. On that trip, I sliced up 2 sidewalls within the first hour. Got the 2 wheels into the other truck and was lucky to find anything in 19s. Later on sliced up the other 2 duratracs on the sidewalls. I had to cut the trip short and was lucky to get out of there and back home safely. Long story short, ditch your 19s for something more common like 18s or 17s.

    I overhauled my entire oem setup and can't be happier. I was able to get 6x 255/70r17s KO2s for $1300. The upfront cost is greater, but tires are way cheaper in 18s and especially cheaper in 17s. If I'm ever in a pinch, ALL mom n pop tire shops carry something in 17s.
     
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  8. m_lars

    m_lars Full Access Member

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    Again, using the Jeep example, most run C or D rated because they don’t want to lose the sidewall flexibility that the E rated tire would. It’s probably a moot point on a 19” wheel, I’ve never looked at them. The Falken Wildpeak A/T3 is available in 2 load ratings in the size I considered before I ultimately bought my Coopers. The sidewall design is the same, but the E tire has 2 more layers of polyester weave to handle a higher PSI and load rating. The layers of polyester are not THE determining factor in sidewall strength or cut resistance, they are for load rating. If the number of plys were the determining factor the E rated Duratracs would have no issue, but they are known to have weak sidewalls. Sidewall design, lugs, materials like Kevlar, overall thickness of the sidewall will will play a bigger part in its toughness than just the number of plys.
     
  9. Troy Angrignon

    Troy Angrignon Full Access Member

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    Okay that makes more sense. So it's more of a design strength/fault than something that can necessarily be inferred the load rating itself. I thought the two were at least roughly correlated. So the best way to know is tribal knowledge such as that from the post above who ripped two Duratracs in an hour. Thanks!


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  10. ryanjl

    ryanjl Full Access Member

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    An LR4's curb weight is over 1,300 pounds more than a JKU.
     
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