Control Arm bushings

Discussion in 'LR4' started by Robin Parsons, Mar 15, 2019.

  1. Robin Parsons

    Robin Parsons Member

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    My 2014 LR4, with 80,000 miles has at least 1 right front control arm bushing. (I think, haven't had on lift yet. Clunks when braking and speed bumps, in right front. Steering shakes at most speeds, braking or not.

    I have seen many options from replacing entire control arms to just bushings and many different bushings.

    1. Is this normal at 80k miles? I dont off road much, but occasionally tow a 4k lb trailer

    2. Should i replace all bushings, upper, lower, left and right front, even if others seem tight (my gut says yes)

    3. Anyone here done it? How difficult in a modestly equipped shop, high jack stands, most tools hand and pneumatic?

    4. I have a 5 ton press and some various mandrels, but is the the aggravation and time to replace bushings worth tge cist savings, which are substantial? Or better to just replace to whole arm assemblies?

    I appreciate and experienced advice.

    I dont turn wrenches any more for years, but the dealer here is always a dissappointment.
     
  2. scott schmerge

    scott schmerge Full Access Member

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    See responses in your text body.
     
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  3. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    If you have the press, I'd consider r/r with oem type. People who go for poly have a weird idea of comfort.;p

    Poly do not necessarily last longer and they are harsh in my opinion. I like them on a sporty car, not my heavy beast.

    I replaced every bit of the suspension two summers ago with the type shop and tools you mention. Even being new to auto wrenching I found it pretty straight forward ans simple.
     
  4. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    850B82BE-7304-40A9-BA0D-1BE68B83419A.jpeg 1499B092-6BCE-4C4D-938A-CEB781863A63.jpeg 51B9537C-65C2-45D2-B60E-02CDD8013EE7.jpeg 2A60BDC6-FA6C-444D-88AE-166D48B953CB.jpeg Driveway “shop” ;)
     
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  5. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    the two odd photos are to see the surface rusty bracket that holds an engine or front differential item. It's right in front of the driver side sway bar bushing and clamp. It impedes the approach angle to the bolts on the clamp, especially the upper one. Loosening this bracket just enough to allow it to swing out about 10-15mm will make the clamp WAY easier to remove and replace.

    If you think you need any control arm bushings, you also need sway bar bushings unless they were done already. You can see the end link in that other more confusing looking photo. They should be replaced as well for best overall refurbishing results.

    I wrote up a number of things to do and specific tools to use in a thread here somewhere.
     
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  6. scott schmerge

    scott schmerge Full Access Member

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    I didn’t notice anything but improvement with poly. The orange is slightly stiffer than stock, but still a significant improvement and very soft ride.
     
  7. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    No offense meant to your choice but it's basically a fad in my opinion. Something different for sake of being different more than an actual worthwhile upgrade or improvement. Two shops specializing in Land Rovers and English vehicles as well as vintage racing both said it's not the best choice for the LR3/4 while they of course use them on the race cars.

    I have them on my BMW and Audi wagons, but those also have upgraded sport sway bars and are meant to be driven in a way that benefits from the stiffer bushings.

    Maybe it's because I run E load tires that I am more aware of the harshness I do not want to be increased but I cannot imagine wanting to give up any sweet compliance these vehicles provide on highway trips.

    The ONLY benefit I see in poly for lr3/4 is the ease of replacement after you've gone that route. So for that one aspect, I may look for an equal density/feel version next time and press the old ones out.
     
  8. scott schmerge

    scott schmerge Full Access Member

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    No offense taken. I feel like the poly was the best route for me for the very reason of ease of replacement. I don’t feel as though there was little to any ride sacrifice, but very much a personal opinion.
     
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  9. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    Hey, I see you're in Charlotte. I'm in Cary right now for a while. Want to meet up at Uwharrie or something. I'm only only michelin ms2 right now for the big trip but it would be fine if mostly dry. I don't know of anywhere else in the state but I'm planning a beach outing soon to Hatteras
     
  10. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    Also, speaking of ride quality. I'd love to meet up even just to ride in yours to see how it feels and handles compared to mine. I have an onboard compressor so we could experiment with tire psi.
     

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