Do bushings save control arms?

Discussion in 'LR4' started by hatch, Nov 22, 2019.

  1. hatch

    hatch Full Access Member

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    The triple whammy of a F+R control arm job, shot front air struts and needing to replace a drive shaft + center bearing was what finally sent my LR3 out to pasture (a decision I still regret to this day).

    Given how outrageously expensive LR control arms are -- I'm trying to be smarter w/ my LR4.

    I live in Philadelphia, and the disastrous conditions of the city streets (an endless armada of potholes, sink holes, cratered trolley tracks, etc) + the prevalence of cobblestone streets is already putting noticeable wear and tear on my MY13 w/ 42k on it. At least I think it is. Over the last few months, I've started hearing the rattle/wobble noises when going over uneven terrain that I've come to associate with worn out bushings and/or control arms.

    I'm assuming that at 42k, the control arms are completely fine, but the bushings are probably starting to wear.

    Anyway, all of this is a long-winded way asking: Is being proactive and replacing bushings as soon as they begin to show signs of wear, to keep them fresh and functional, is a good way of protecting the life of the control arms?
     
  2. hatch

    hatch Full Access Member

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    I guess the other question would be whether it's a viable DIY job, as well. IIRC, it was the labor on the control arm job that was the killer. Parts were only around $600 or so. But every shop I talked to said it was a lot of labor ... but I feel like I had, at some point, done some bushing-only replacements on the LR3 without getting murdered on labor.
     
  3. ryanjl

    ryanjl Full Access Member

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    The control arms are steel. They will last the life of the vehicle by themselves.

    But within the control arm are the ball joints and bushings. Most people replace the whole thing because it's a hell of a lot easier than trying to press out one or the other of those, for not much more money.
     
  4. avslash

    avslash Full Access Member

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    There are reports of trucks going over 100K with the poly bushes.

    Would still need to replace ball joints though. Although that is an order of magnitude easier than dropping 8 control arms.

    I just bit the bullet and replaced every bushing that I could with poly. The only rubber bushes left on the truck are the rear wheel knuckle bushings. I could not locate a poly option for those.

    So far, I am pleased as I don't notice a difference in ride quality, but the real test will be how they perform in 50K miles or so.
     
  5. hatch

    hatch Full Access Member

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    I see. Well it seems crazy to replace control arms at 42k because of some rattle/wobble.

    I can remember all the shops I talked to about the control arm replacement job (which was at 198k on my LR3) saying how everything gets fused together and getting them off is where the labor comes in ... that often grinding/cutting is needed, etc ... does doing the job early before things get worse make it more practical as a DIY job?
     
  6. zski128

    zski128 Member

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    My MY16 with 39k had front bushings gone on both side. Found small drops of oil on the garage floor one morning. Both where replaced under warranty but the dealer just pressed in new bushings. So at 42k yours could be gone. Check for any oily residue around the rear bushings on the front control arms.
     
  7. BeemerNut

    BeemerNut Full Access Member

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    Yes Poly's will go 100K miles without them becoming sloppy joints.
    With replacing ball joints get them with zerk fittings and lube them every other oil change.
    If "lifetime ball joints" that do not have zerks the ball does not have a grease groove allowing grease to get past the ball refilling the rubber grease sack. There are ways around this "lifetime" BS. Drill, tap and install zerk fittings but one caution, do not pump grease in as it will not pass the ball and blow out the crimped n metal end cap instantly.You would have to make a tool, modifying a welder's tubing Vice-Grip tool. Reshaped fingers now allowing clamping onto the ball joint dislocating the ball off it's seat app 1/16" to 1/8" now allowing grease to bypass the ball refilling the sack. I'm at 153K miles, original ball joints still having snug stiff resistance rotating the tie rod body to ball ends darn near as stiff as new. True they say "lifetime" yup when it fails be it 5K or 30K miles that was the "lifetime of that joint". Add playing submarine without displacing water possibly entering the joints you now have pretty bright brown colored substance oozing out called rust. Your call or open up your wallet again and again....~~=o&o>.....
     
  8. blake aiken

    blake aiken Member

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    I found this kit from Atlantic British https://www.roverparts.com/Parts/9746O

    It looks like a compete kit but I’m still getting familiar with the truck. Can anyone comment on this or a different kit?
     
  9. BeemerNut

    BeemerNut Full Access Member

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    Personal opinions, damn they are proud of them bushings. I would rather have graphite impregnated poly bushings if they are an option. On another note are there different manufactures with different hardness numbers to chose from? A trade off, softer with a quiet ride vs slightly louder with harshness also more precise steering input and handling.
    I'm not into these "modern" LR's and had options with Poly suspension bushings for the 95 D1.
    Coming from England, i'd keep looking for other poly bushings from other countries if possible.
    .....~~=o&o>.....
     
  10. avslash

    avslash Full Access Member

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    That is what I installed.
     

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