Rules of Thumb Maintenance Guide

LRMore

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Recently picked up a '13 HSE Lux with 55K miles and am only vaguely familiar with the general preventative maintenance things to look out for so thought I'd put down what I have heard (or think I heard) from friends who own LR3/4'S through the years.

may be well out of date info, or unecessary or overkill. Thoughts?

-Do some preventative maintenance straight away and replace water inlet, water pump and front + rear crossover pipe, thermostat (if never done) maybe plastic bits of cooling manifold depending on service history
-Oil change every 5-7K
-Full service every 15K
-Replace tyres/brakes/rotors every 25K
-Diff fluid every 30K
-Lower control arms every 40-50K
-Power steering fluid every 50k
-change transfer case every 50k
-front and rear crossover pipes every 45-75K
-Coolant hose 70-90K
-Flush transmission & differentials at 70K
-Change all hoses at 70K
-Flush gearbox oil at 80K
-Water pump at least once by 100K
-Fuel pump belt, cambelt and oil pump at 105K
-Complete fluid swap every 2 years

Would be interested to hear your personal maintenance guidelines - is this a good general framework to follow?
 
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Arman

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Diff fluid 30k? Control arms 40k? Tires and rotors 25k? Transfer case? Complete fluid every 2yrs?
Unless you go racing your LR4 every weekend, almost everything on the list seems to be way overkill...

Once Crossover cooling pipes are replaced there is not much different about these trucks than anything else... transmission and diff oil every 50-100k (depends if towing or city or highway), regular filters and oil change.
You could try to shorten oil change intervals even more to 3-5k miles, there are rumors it helps avoiding wear on chain tensioner guides, but again - this is pretty mysterious topic full of rumors.
For control arms I installed polybush and those apparently should last a lifetime.
It might be a good idea to service air compressor, especially if you live in humid area (air dryer and gaskets)
I got lifetime alignment at firestone for $200, they seem to be doing good enough job (I put suspension in tight tolerance mode and raise and lower the car from offroad height to normal height before leaving it there).
Gap iidtool is probably the best investment in the car I've done.

The rest is - drive till it really needs to be replaced. I wouldn't just throw parts into this car, unnecessarily, it's pretty reliable vehicle overall.

There will be small things like PCV valve, Tailgate actuator, parking brake etc that you could DIY or get indy shop do much cheaper than dealer.
 
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timc930

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Agree ^^^^^

What is “tight tolerance mode”?
 
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Arman

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Agree ^^^^^

What is “tight tolerance mode”?
Our car has height sensors on each wheel, that is how it knows the height. Typically car computer has pretty large tolerances to height (I don't remember exact numbers, but say +- 1cm), which means if the height is a bit off within this range it won't adjust suspension height.
When you put it into the "tight tolerance mode" (you need dealer level computer or IID Gap tool) the tolerances are reduced to say +-1mm. So if the height is off by more than 1mm, the car will adjust the suspension height.

There are conflicting feedbacks about using "Tight tolerance mode" for alignment. THe main concern is that when the alignment is adjusted - the height will change slightly as well. And if the car is in tight tolerance mode, it will adjust the height of the vehicle, which in turn will also change the alignment. So you can imagine frustration of the mechanic, when he does adjustments and seeing all "green" tolerances, then looks at the screen 30 seconds later and all of a sudden car changes height and it is out of alignment again...

So instead some mechanics rise the vehicle height to offroad, then lower it to normal driving height just before starting the alignment. This presumably is the best way to put the height of all 4 wheels into the normal driving height, without using the "tight tolerance mode".

There are people with strong opinions to each method... And then there are 99% of drivers who don't even know about those things and live a normal life ;)

P.S. I recommend to do a full inspection of major items annualy (just like with any other car older than 5-10 years). What you are looking for:
- Oil leaks from the engine, transmission, transfer case, differentials, steering. Transfer case in particular has tendency to sip oil through the seam. Cheap repair if caught early, very expensive to replace if it runs out of oil.
- Torn rubber boots, loose joints (CV axles, steering tie rods, suspension air bag dust boots if equipped, suspension joints etc)

When replacing the transmission oil - always replace filter. For 8-speed people - only use original ZF filter, never use "alternatives", the difference in quality is huge but is only visible if cutting the filter apart.

There is a YouTube channel with a lot of good material on Land Rover maintenance where I learned most of issues our car could potentialy have. But the channel is all in russian: https://www.youtube.com/c/LRWestMSK/videos
 

Shredahead

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I’d add timing chain tesioners,guides, pulleys and rails to your list. although I did hear somewhere they fixed the issues on the later 5.0L in the 2013’s
 

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