Setting myself up to do this right...

damnskippy

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I first want to thank all of you on this forum for your time and super insightful help you are able to offer. You guys are golden. This will be a lengthy post, I apologize in advance.

For those who have followed my saga along, I am in the market for an '04 Disco with under 50K on it and I live in Jackson Hole, WY- over 4 hours from a LR dealership. I will do this one of two ways (I will do Carfax check either way):
1) Purchase from a LR dealership that is certified Pre-owned that is still under original factory warranty.
2) Find one from another dealership that has the low miles, hopefully has had 1 owner and all maintanence has been performed on time by LR and is still under original factory warranty.

I intend to get vehicle updated maintanence at LR and purchase an extended warranty (although not sure which one or what kind yet, thought I'd talk to my trusty local mechanic who works on rovers here in Jackson hole a bit more about this)

**Please note I will mainly be doing day to day highway driving, will be using 4 wheel drive quite a bit in winter, and only some 4 wheel drive on trail roads***

NOW, TO MY QUESTIONS:
1) I want to be able to do as much for my Discovery myself as I can, keeping all pertainent fluid levels to where they need to be, change air filters, hose checks, oil changes, tire checks, etc. HOWEVER, I am a complete novice at this. Where can I find out how to do all these things myself? Are there really detailed manuals, dvd's available? If so, what are the best ones and where do I find them?

2) From reading through forums, I feel the more I pamper my 'lil Landy, the happier it will be so where can I learn to be hands on? I did think I could pay my trusty mechanic a few hours to show me some stuff. Changing break pads sounds like a daunting task to me, but maybe it isn't so hard, I can change tires easily enough and am a female willing to learn more.

3) What tools, fluids, filters, hoses, (pads?), clamps, parts etc. should I keep on hand? I want to be prepared. Which of these items should I actually purchase through a LR dealership/service department? Chances I'll be purchasing my Disco in Utah, Nevada, Colorado or California so I'll most likely be passing by a dealership somewhere. I'd really like to have an arsonal of all the fluids I will most likely need on hand. That green stuff I've read about, the coolant, the oil, the fluids, all of it. What special tools? Oh yeah, I guess I should get one of those code scanners too.

4) I've mentioned it before, cold weather starts are a big issue for me. Today is April 14th and it was 3 degrees this morning. You can imagine how cold it can get months upon months. What do I need to keep on hand to insure that I'll get good starts as much as I can? Can I easily access fuel line to see if frozen and if it is, can I use those hand warmer packs to help melt it? I think I read somewhere that fuel tank should remain at least 1/4 full in cold weather, do you guys concur with that?

Ok, it's sort of like getting a nursery prepared for when you are ready to bring home the little baby. However in my case, I don't want a kid I want a land rover! My family would argue my priorities are a bit screwed up, but hey...I know what I want and foreknowledge, preparation, and patience will be key :smile: to what I hope is a happy, long life for me and the "Landy". Some of you out there may argue a kid is actually easier, but I am trying to keep positive and proactive!

I thank you all for any assistance you throw my direction. A.J.
 

joey

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NOW, TO MY QUESTIONS:
1) I want to be able to do as much for my Discovery myself as I can, keeping all pertainent fluid levels to where they need to be, change air filters, hose checks, oil changes, tire checks, etc. HOWEVER, I am a complete novice at this. Where can I find out how to do all these things myself? Are there really detailed manuals, dvd's available? If so, what are the best ones and where do I find them?

- Most of the above you can get at any auto parts store except maybe the hoses and Serpentine belt (order all parts from an online vendor to save a lot of money) I would either go with Nathan (www.discountbritishparts.com) or www.atlanticbritish.com

Detailed Manuals... sorry nothing is very detailed when it comes to Land Rover manuals, they are more like guidelines. But my recommendation is the RAVE CD that is floating around on the web... or I am sure a PM to the right people on here will get you access to a downloadable version.

2) From reading through forums, I feel the more I pamper my 'lil Landy, the happier it will be so where can I learn to be hands on? I did think I could pay my trusty mechanic a few hours to show me some stuff. Changing break pads sounds like a daunting task to me, but maybe it isn't so hard, I can change tires easily enough and am a female willing to learn more.

- I wouldn't say pamper, but take care of issues as the come up, and change the fluids often. Brakes on the D2 are much easier than a D1, at least the rotors anyway, the pads are not hard for either. Just requires basic tools and a C-clamp.

3) What tools, fluids, filters, hoses, (pads?), clamps, parts etc. should I keep on hand? I want to be prepared. Which of these items should I actually purchase through a LR dealership/service department? Chances I'll be purchasing my Disco in Utah, Nevada, Colorado or California so I'll most likely be passing by a dealership somewhere. I'd really like to have an arsenal of all the fluids I will most likely need on hand. That green stuff I've read about, the coolant, the oil, the fluids, all of it. What special tools? Oh yeah, I guess I should get one of those code scanners too.

- OBDII scanner will help, but remember it will not read all the codes on a Land Rover, and my not read them correctly. Land Rover didn't follow the OBDII rules, so some things are a little off. I Don't think I have ever bought a part other than real small stuff from the dealer. In the almost 5 years I have owned my Disco I have only bought a couple of sun roof screws, and the D2 version of the Cup holders. Again buy parts online.

Tools and extras, it really depends on how much room you have and how involved you really want to get. If all out, go buy a good set of tools, a decent starter set will cost 3 - 4 hundred for most of the tools you will need... sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers, ratchets, allen wrenches, and C-clamps... just to name a few. It isn't like you can just list a list of tools to do the job, because almost every job will required a different tools.

4) I've mentioned it before, cold weather starts are a big issue for me. Today is April 14th and it was 3 degrees this morning. You can imagine how cold it can get months upon months. What do I need to keep on hand to insure that I'll get good starts as much as I can? Can I easily access fuel line to see if frozen and if it is, can I use those hand warmer packs to help melt it? I think I read somewhere that fuel tank should remain at least 1/4 full in cold weather, do you guys concur with that?

- Cold really depends on if you do certain things, like with any vehcile... keep the fluids thin (i.e. 0w30 for cold weather for the engine) Go with light weight oils for the Diffs and Transfer case and the transmission. I would also suggest full synthetics as they will not freeze as easily. Fuel at least 1/4 tank, then less fuel the easier it is to freeze. If you have a garage, park inside, if not, can you run an extension cord to the vehicle? If so a 60 watt bulb under the hood will help keep the engine warm... Lots of cold weather tricks.
 

damnskippy

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Thanks Joey, What "hoses" should I have on hand and exactly what is a Serpentine belt?
 

bleizit

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I wouldn't necessarily have the hoses and serp belt on hand. If a radiator hose or an oil cooler line starts to leak, get it then. Preventative maintenance is the way to go and the way to learn IMHO. The serpentine belt is the long belt in front of the engine that attached to the crankshaft, PS unit, alternator, etc...

Here is a link to the RAVE cd that has all the service manuals for your vehicle: http://green-oval.com/joomla/index.php?option=com_docman&task=cat_view&gid=13&Itemid=29
 

joey

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Sorry I didn't reply sooner... been busy to say the least.

Hoses (since you state you live very far from a dealer and I don't think you want to wait 2 or 3 days to get the parts)

Order a complete Radiator hose kit. I recommend changing them every 2 - 3 years depending on mileage. Change the S-Belt at the same time... if all goes well you will never need a spare, but if you have them when you get ready to change them or if you to have issues, you have them.
 

damnskippy

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What fluids (including but not limilted to coolents, lubricants, oils) and filters should I have on hand? Also, I've heard mentioned on the forum about seafoam and other additives, do those sound like those would be a good idea for me to have on hand as well?:confused:

What fluids should I be checking on a very regular basis?:rolleyes:

Also, I realize the '04 S has less options than the SE but I am not sure what they all are: from what I can see, the front bumper is different, it doesn't have those driving lights, it does not have any wood trim inside, seats are vinyl (not leather?) and I'm not sure what the deal is with the sun and moon roofs...does the S model have them but they do not open? What are the other differences between the the S and SE?

You guys are the best!:wink:
 

lsawicki

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Here's what I have back in my Range Rover Classic: Tool set, rubber gloves (wear them when working on your car, you will definitely get dirt and grease on your hands), WD-40, Rags, cable ties (they will come in handy) and some SeaFoam.

SeaFoam is a really good fuel injector/intake cleaner. If you have rough idle, pour a can in the gas tank. To clean the intake, you disconnect a vacuum hose that leads into the plenum (air chamber at the top of the engine...discovery engines are a bit different than my range rover classic, so make sure you use the right hose), and slowly pour 1/3 to 1/2 a can of SeaFoam into the hose so that it gets sucked into the intake. Shut your engine off and off and wait 15-20 minutes to let the SeaFoam do it's magic, and then restart. You might have to give it some gas to restart, but once you do, be warned...the fumes will be INTENSE....I usually smoke up my whole neighborhood after doing this. Then drive it like your stole it to make sure to get the RPM's high to loosen up any carbon deposit. Drive around until the exhaust is back to normal (usually 5-10 minutes, depending of amount you used). Best chemical additive I have used!
 
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damnskippy

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I live right at the base of Teton Pass and am often driving over this thing, it can be rather daunting especially with bad weather:

"Teton Pass (el. 8431 ft./2570 m.), is a high mountain pass located in the Teton Range near the border between southeastern Idaho and northwestern Wyoming between the towns of Jackson, Wyoming and Victor, Idaho. The pass provides access from Jackson and the Jackson Hole valley to the Teton Basin and southeastern Idaho.

Wyoming Highway 22 crosses the pass and becomes Idaho State Highway 33 at the border. The pinnacle of the pass is 8,400 feet and located approximately 11 miles (18 km) west of Jackson, Wyoming. The maximum grade on the road is 10%. Several avalanche slide paths traverse the road along its length, including the famous Glory Bowl slide area. During the winter months, the road is often closed in the early mornings for avalanche control by the Wyoming Department of Transportation. The area is a popular backcountry skiing destination for both locals and visitors.

The pass is located in the Teton Range a few miles south of Grand Teton National Park. Parts of the pass are located in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and the Bridger-Teton National Forest. Wilson a small town, sits at the base of the east side of the pass and Teton Village and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort ski area is nearby."


When I talked to the trusty local Land Rover mechanic, he says the mere fact that people have land rovers and are traveling over this pass seems to always set off engine codes-but it is not anything to worry about- the driving here and around Jackson Hole is not the same like most places around the country. He said that the engine going up this pass runs extremely rich and then switches to lean coming down.

I can picture myself blasting up there with SeaFoam after using to clean air intake...how often would one use this stuff? Are most folks just using it in their gas tanks?
 

joey

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Doing that kind of driving, I would have the ECU reprogrammed so you can benefit from a better running vehicle.
 

damnskippy

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Joey, Who and where would I get the ECU reprogrammed (I don't even know what that is)? If I purchase an '04 with still factory warranty should I take it to Land Rover to do and what am I actually telling them to do, should I just explain the driving conditions I will be encountering? Or, is this something local trusty land rover mechanic can easily do...I just don't know. Sorry to come across as such a ****** about this stuff but if I don't ask questions then I'll never learn.

Also, did you happen to see my question above that asks what are the more specific differences between an S and SE model? Wondering if you could weigh in on that too. I thought S models had vinyl seats but then I am seeing some advertised with leather (?). Also, do S models come with 16" tires and SE's with 18". Looks like I can save money getting an S model but I am trying to understand all the goodies I will be giving up.

Thanks again! A.J.:stupido3:
 

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