Timing Reinstall - Crankshaft Won't Turn by Hand

Extrageration

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The service guide indicates the front passenger side as cylinder #1. I could easily discern air being pushed out as if to indicate a compression ******. That being said, the guide also seems to indicate that getting the woodruff key at 6 0'clock should get me where I need to be to lock the crank in place and begin with cam and chain installation.

I think I'm going to back-track, set the crank with the woodruff key at 6 o'clock, lock everything in place and see if this changes my situation. It would make sense (to me at least) to rotate the cams (without the chains installed) to test for interference at that point.

Does anyone know if there are any potential issues with rotating the cams with the chains off?
 
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Shoshone

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To be clear, you can't rotate the cams with Any piston at TDC. One or more valves will hit the piston. As was posted earlier, the crank must be at a position where no piston is at TDC, and all pistons are about half way up the cylinder or at the bottom of the cylinder.
Probably best to pull the chains, confirm 100% that number 1 is at TDC compression, and retime the system. There are many videos about lining up the chain paint marks, cam marks and crank. Watch as many as you need. Back in the old days, there was only two marks to line up, and still people got it wrong! This is a complex engine and tough for a first effort.
 

greiswig

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...set the crank with the woodruff key at 6 o'clock, lock everything in place and see if this changes my situation. It would make sense (to me at least) to rotate the cams (without the chains installed) to test for interference at that point.
What @Shoshone said, and what I said earlier: If you put the crank 90 degrees off in either direction from TDC or BDC, you should be able to turn things without risk of valves interfering with the pistons because all pistons will be at half travel in the bore. At close to TDC or BDC, some pistons are going to be at the top of their travel.

As for whether or not to turn the camshaft, I can't think of a reason why you can't do so if you have the crank timed thusly. But I'll yield the floor to people who are more familiar with this particular setup to respond.
 

John Robison

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The factory tools bolt onto the heads and lock the cams into the correct position. Another tool locks the crank. If you are starting with everything unknown, I would lift the heads off. Set the fixing tool on each cylinder head and set the crank tool in the block. Then put the heads on and string the gears and chains. It should all be in correct time using that method. Note the engine will take a fair bit of effort to turn when all this is in place. When you rotate it you will be pushing the valve springs down so you will need a 1/2 drive breaker bar to turn it - don't expect "by hand" to be anything less. You will feel harder and easier parts as the cams turn but no "hard stops".
 
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+1 to John Robinson. Ebay has tool packages reasonably priced to lock the cams and crank. One tooth off can spell disaster. Its precise work. A half inch drive ratchet, no sparkplugs should allow you to turn it over. Hard stops are valve to piston contact; turn it over real slow to avoid damage or bending. Once happy, hand turn it over a few more times and put the lock tool back in for the flywheel/crank then check the cam flats to be certain all is well. The factory book is easy to understand and I pencil line-out every step to ensure I haven’t missed. Its one of the few jobs that has devastating consequences if not done perfectly; you are spot on for calling on the forum for insight. You don’t want part of a piston sitting on your office desk as a conversation piece. Let it be someone elses. Good luck! You’ll get it right, not to worry.
 

Extrageration

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Thanks so much for the help and positive vibes everyone. I have invested in all of the special tools and have not cheaped out in that regard. I wanted to get this right and have been willing to spend the cash for the special tools and quality parts. I'm viewing this as a project but also a learning experience, so anything less than a fatal error is fine. I've decided to take John Robinson's advice and pull the heads again. Working on this between the day job and parenting so it's a slow go, but I'll report back once I have an update or run into anything concerning.
 

djkaosone

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Sorry, I came to the party late. Hopefully this is resolved. Dumb question, but did you put the transmission into (N)eutral, remove the starter locking plate, or crankshaft sensor locking tool before trying to rotate the crank?

To find timing on the block, make sure the chuck on the crank is pointed down at 6 o'clock AND the oil pump timing chains lines up at the marks. That'll ensure timing is lined up on the bottom end and top end WITH the oil pump and HPFP camshafts.

The image is upside down, but you get the picture:
1646760582939.png


Once the bottom end is set, the heads can be manually rotated clockwise to position and locked with the crankshaft sensor locking tool. To set the heads, there are 2 markings per cam sprockets for intake and exhaust and lining up timing really comes from the chain itself. On the chain, there are 2 yellow marks and 1 white mark. The white mark lines up to the chain guide mark.

Bank 2 timing chain mark:
1646760909595.png


Then you line up the chain on bank 2 exhaust and intake camshafts at the markings on the camshaft, but don't put the chain on, and then you can lock up the back side with the camshaft locks. The chain can now be put into place. It has very little play on the camshafts to rotate clockwise/counter-clockwise to line up with the chain markings. Once this is done on both bank 2 and bank 1, you should remove the starter plate lock, crankshaft sensor lock, camshaft locks, and keep it in (N)eutral before rotating the crank clockwise. Just make sure it spins, it should build compression and have a bit of resistance. BUT do NOT force it.

Hope you get the truck running!
 

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