Towing - I Have Not Done My Homework...

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txfromwi

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I have not done my homework, it's easier just to ask - I appreciate your patience.

So in spring 2024, yes 2024, my D will have graduated from University and we are going to need to tow something behind to get all her stuff home, or rent a truck, or send a Pod...
It's about 1,600 miles.
I will have a few weeks this summer, while her LR4 is home, to get it ready for spring 2024, because it leaves again in the fall of 2023 and lives at school.

Its the 2016 HSE.
I do have a Rover hitch.
Last summer I personally completed the following:
Transmission pan/filter and fluid
New brakes/rotors and fluid
Complete crossover pipe plumbing project, water pump, thermostat and new coolant
Supercharger maintenance - coupling and oil
New suspension compressor and height calibration
Of course motor oil

Any other maintenance items I need to be addressing?
I think the truck might have the towing package (we purchased it used) - how do I determine that, I have never looked.
Electrical connections?
Should we get a trailer with it's own brakes or no big deal?
Should I get one of those "height adjusters" for between the hitch and the trailer?
Best source for a trailer - there is a nice UHaul only 2 blocks from her apartment , so that is convenient, but...

Or should I just rent a Penske truck and drive it down?
Or maybe we just send a Pod?
Don't want any damage to the LR4.

None of us have driven with a trailer previously.

Any advice much appreciated!
Thanks!
 

ftillier

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I found the OEM hitch receiver to place the hitch a bit low, so ended up reversing my hitch ball mount to raise the ball up to compensate. Used it with a U-Haul car hauler to tow a Miata - the car likely weighs less than the trailer itself. Towed like a dream, you just have to get used to driving slower than you would normally. The car hauler trailer had trailer brakes that did not require a trailer brake controller.

You will need at the very least the wiring harness for the trailer - easy to tell if you have it, there should be a connector (both 7-pin and 4-pin) to the left of the frame recovery point once you remove the cover that's in the bumper. The cover is held on with two quarter-turn quick release fasteners, just need a coin or key to turn them.

Depending on how heavy a trailer you plan on towing, and its braking configuration, you might need a trailer brake controller.

Things to be aware while towing is height and width - the stock mirrors don't extend super far out, so a narrow trailer would suit best. Backing up takes practice. Other than that, just take it easy.
 

Al Pizzica

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You didn't really tell us how much stuff we are talking about but even Uhauls 6x9 trailer full of 2500# of stuff should be no problem. You should price it but I'll bet Uhaul is your cheapest option.
Agree you will most likely have to flip a bar around to raise the hitch and that if you have the wiring plug then it is ready to tow.
I hauled a Uhaul car hauler (2000#) with surge breaks 500 miles with a 3800# Jeep on it and it was not "comfortable" but very safe. With less than half that weight you should be fine. (But I do have the V8)
Finally, there are thousands of idiots that spent no time online researching it who haul Uhaul trailers all the time, overload and overspeed them and they do fine so I suspect you will be alright!
 

BigBriDogGuy

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I have been thinking about doing some hauling as well and have read through a lot of these streams. When I look at the LR4 and then look at trailers, it seems like common sense would dictate that you not put something on there that's ridiculously large or heavy. My take away is that the LR4 is heavy to begin with and doesn't have a lot of extra load capacity to play around with. The V8 has enough power to haul 7,700 lbs but the tongue weight is rated lower (like 550 lbs.). So what? You have an engine that can handle a lot more pulling than the suspension can take? Apparently the factory hitch can take 10% of the pulling capacity, so that doesn't seem to be the "weak link". Even if it were, seems like it would be easy enough to upgrade the hitch rating with a beefier after-market hitch. The one factor that I can't exactly dial in is the air suspension. Maybe that doesn't like too much tongue weight. I've read some posts that suggest the air bags adjust on the fly when the trailer is attached. If the axles and tires are rated to take the weight, it would seem you should be fine. That said, I worry about the self-leveling suspension and how it might interpret tongue weight.

I worked as a sales guy for a custom boat trailer manufacturer and tongue weight was a big deal. You didn't want to be light or the trailer would fishtail. You didn't want to be heavy or you risked damaging the tongue. On the vehicle end, a heavy tongue would likely increase road wear on the rear tires (at least). Since we were only responsible for the trailer end of it, we didn't comment on how the tow vehicle was setup (didn't want the liability). We liked to shoot for a little over 10%. That eliminated fishtailing while not putting unnecessary stress on the rear end of the vehicle.

My one concern is that the rear suspension might decide to auto-adjust on the fly in a way that had the rear end lifted up above level. In my opinion, that would not be good. I would anticipate a lot of fishtailing in that scenario and if I were traveling at speed... like I said, not good.
 
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ftillier

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My receiver attachment has printed in the cast iron 770lb tongue weight, which is 10% of the tow rating:
PXL_20230405_013613937.jpg


I wouldn't worry about the self leveling suspension, if anything it will prevent the rear tires from wearing funny. It won't adjust the ride height higher than intended, just back to "normal". As long as you don't also max out the cargo capacity, there should be no issues.
 

CRYA

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Our trucks are extremely capable tow rigs so long as the nut behind the wheel is capable. Towing is a bit of an art form. I for one wouldn’t want my first at-bat to be 1,600 miles of dedication. Towing a trailer brings with it a ton of required situational awareness like if I pull in here, how am I getting out. If I can’t, can I back out safely. And does the pit stop for a comfort break have space to park a trailer.

It adds some stress too as I remember my early tow days.

The stock hitch is low so if you’re renting from U-haul, might as well be ready to purchase whatever height tongue levels the rental with the truck when you’re there.

But if you have the means for a POD, I’d just do that.

But towing is a great skill to have.
 

BigBriDogGuy

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Thanks ftillier, that's actually reassuring. I can't imagine a scenario where they would have a 7,700 lbs. towing capacity and 770 lbs. (10%) rated receiver and not have that be the intended max tongue weight. It would be so misleading as to invite overloading the tongue. I can't imagine Land Rover's lawyers signing off on stamping the factory receiver at 770 lbs. if the max capacity was 550 lbs.

Although it provides some headroom, I still don't see myself pushing up against the edge of that max capacity. The sticker in the driver's side door lists the maximum load capacity as 1,301 lbs. That's a bit odd, because my curb weight is approximately 5,700 lbs. and the overall load capacity of the front and rear axles combined (with appropriately rated tires) is roughly 7,300 lbs. In my book, that gives me 1,600 lbs. of load capacity to play with. Where did that other 300 lbs. go? I've seen this discrepancy discussed in other threads, but haven't come across a solid answer as to why it exists.

Let's be conservative and take 1,300 lbs. as the right number. Four passengers with a total weight of 600 lbs. Maybe a 100 lbs. roof rack. 50 lbs. of dog. 150 lbs. of gear. Already at 900 lbs. That only leaves 400 lbs. of tongue weight. I like the 1,600 lbs. carrying capacity a lot better. Even then, with a 6,000 lbs. trailer you're basically maxed out. Maybe I'm seeing it wrong. Seems a bit tight.
 

ktm525

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Thanks ftillier, that's actually reassuring. I can't imagine a scenario where they would have a 7,700 lbs. towing capacity and 770 lbs. (10%) rated receiver and not have that be the intended max tongue weight. It would be so misleading as to invite overloading the tongue. I can't imagine Land Rover's lawyers signing off on stamping the factory receiver at 770 lbs. if the max capacity was 550 lbs.

Although it provides some headroom, I still don't see myself pushing up against the edge of that max capacity. The sticker in the driver's side door lists the maximum load capacity as 1,301 lbs. That's a bit odd, because my curb weight is approximately 5,700 lbs. and the overall load capacity of the front and rear axles combined (with appropriately rated tires) is roughly 7,300 lbs. In my book, that gives me 1,600 lbs. of load capacity to play with. Where did that other 300 lbs. go? I've seen this discrepancy discussed in other threads, but haven't come across a solid answer as to why it exists.

Let's be conservative and take 1,300 lbs. as the right number. Four passengers with a total weight of 600 lbs. Maybe a 100 lbs. roof rack. 50 lbs. of dog. 150 lbs. of gear. Already at 900 lbs. That only leaves 400 lbs. of tongue weight. I like the 1,600 lbs. carrying capacity a lot better. Even then, with a 6,000 lbs. trailer you're basically maxed out. Maybe I'm seeing it wrong. Seems a bit tight.

You have just discovered the issue with many SUVs (and modern 4 door trucks) who tow and carry passengers. There is a balance of everything. A LR4 cannot tow it's max rating and carry a full load of passengers, at least not legally.

You will also notice that the tire inflation pressures are listed as 36 front, 42 rear. Seems like an odd combo but here in North America that 42 assumes you are running full load. In other places you may see a second set of numbers like 36 front, 37 rear (half load). But ever since the Firestone debacle the lawyers must have gotten rid of that.

Here is what a tire placard looks like in parts of the world where lawyers don't rule the roost:

Screenshot 2023-04-05 090031.jpg
 

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