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Typical repair costs

Discussion in 'Range Rover' started by E409, May 11, 2020.

  1. E409

    E409 New Member

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    Hey guys, I’m very new to the world of Land Rovers - recently had a rude awakening with regard to repair costs. I found an independent garage where I live (Toronto) but since I’m not really mechanically inclines I have no idea if I’m getting ripped off or not. Thought I’d get an opinion:

    [​IMG]

    Keep in mind I’m in Canada, so prices in USD would be about 70% of that - so about $4300 USD total for the work listed.

    What do you think? Am I getting hosed? Should I try and find another garage?


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  2. DaytonaRS7

    DaytonaRS7 Active Member

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    i think they are kind of double dipping the labor for the control arms/hubs/endlinks.

    All of that work requires unbolting the adjoining parts, but they are pricing it as individual repairs. example, hubs and control arms.
    not to mention, they are charging book hours for the right side control arm, then another 2.6 hr to cut the bolts? Id expect an additional 1 hr for seized bolt difficulty.

    For reference, a shop near me just replaced a front left lower control arm and endlink. I supplied the control arm, all new hardware, and endlink. parts cost me $200 (not OEM). repair labor cost me $250. Alignment $150.
     
  3. E409

    E409 New Member

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    Thanks for the insight! I may continue the search for another independent shop.

    Unfortunately a few hours after I got the truck back the water pump went and I had to bring it back to fix that as well. When it rains it pours...

    I really like the truck but damn it does hurt a bit still!


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  4. RR06 hse warrior

    RR06 hse warrior Member

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    I’m curious how much they charge for a water pump and did the work fix your O2 sensor problem?
     
  5. John Robison

    John Robison Member

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    You should understand that there are two models for pricing service. In the flat rate model, each job is quoted. $440 for job A, $300 for job B, $510 for job C. The shop has to be prepared for the possibility you will say "only do B," or that you do them all. If there is overlap, or the tech is fast and gets the work done in less time than the bid would suggest, the shop wins.

    If the tech is slow he or the shop lose out, so they have every incentive to bid so they won't lose while not bidding so high that they don't get any work. That is the most common scenario for auto repair, and if you agreed in advance to the prices for A, B, and C you have little to complain about re the time it takes to do it since you agreed in advance.

    One problem with that approach is that we often encounter surprises when doing work on older cars; things that will take more time to address. If you are working to a bid number you just let that stuff go, knowing it's not part of the job, and they can come back later and tackle it. However it often leads to scenarios as described here where a shop fixes A,B, and C today and D breaks on the way home but could have been addressed if not on a bid.

    The alternative is to say everything is billed on a time and materials basis. Shop does whatever you ask, and if they find other problems and you want to fix them, the final bill is simply the total hours worked and parts used. The difficulty some have is that the final cost isn't known in advance, but I contend that you can't know the final cost of most repairs on older vehicles anyway, since you can't anticipate everything on older cars. You have to have a shop you feel is trustworthy and capable to follow this method but it gets better results.

    The proof of that is the fact that the first method - flat rate - prevails in shops that cater to a throw-away culture; fix the car until problems pile up and then get another. Time and materials is the only way the restorers who show winning cars at Concours of America or Pebble Beach work, because that level of craftsmanship is not sold on a bid basis.

    Most people are not at either extreme, but it's worth thinking about
     

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