2010 LR4 LCA replacement...... drive shaft pain :(

Mozambique

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Ok. So if you pull the hub towards you about 2-3” then you should be able to drive it out.
The inner spline of the drive shaft essentially floats inside the front differential as the hub articulates up and down.
So........ LCA is now hanging down again only connected to the knuckle by the ball joint. I tried pulling the hub towards me as you suggest. In reality it only moves up and down as per normal direction of travel, not out towards me per se. This straightens the CV axle which would seem to do nothing to help create some extension to allow the shaft to be driven backwards and out. I gave it a few taps with the hammer and only minor movement. Next step would be to try the air hammer again.

If I jack the knuckle up a couple of inches would that replicate the "pulling out" you describe?

Its odd. Living in Toronto would not be suprised if damn thing was rusted in there solid. However, so far it has moved 1/4", so it seems it wants to come out.
 

Mozambique

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Note - steering tie rod still attached to the knuckle. That limits pulling the knuckle outwards.........didn't want to detach the tie rod ball joint as doubtless boot will tear and I don't have a replacement.
 

Mozambique

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Just tried air hammer....... it worked!!!
Jacking up knuckle a couple of inches is all it took.
Thank YOU for your generous help Stuart!!!
 

BeemerNut

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Your thread about removing the halfshaft? I read "driveshaft" in this thread then had to rethink what was going on what you ment vs what was posted?

The secret is to have anything being hammered or chiesled apart is to have the item "bucked"---item being hammered or chiesled backed with something solid like a heavy slug of iron so the impact or sheariing energy is applied to the item vs having it deflected and bouncing around not absorbing any impact energy.
See this all the time with failed attempts, the person and item half apart then stopped with a half mangled item project.
Splined halfshaft into the wheel hub, apply waterproof marine grade blue grease able to take apart in the future vs rusted in especially those living in wet, salted states and those that like to play submarine.

A large good quality compressor especially one with a vertical receiver saving floor space in the shop as well having 60 or 80 gallon capacity receiver is your best investment.

I was asked to help disconnect all electrical at a Toyota dealership closing their doors, 5 1/2 hrs. free labor later and $250 a 5 Hp Saylor Beall ($3,400 compressor after tax) with 60 gal. vertical tank a shop space saving item was mine. With boom truck loaded I was gone.
NIB auction win $237 Baldor 1 phase motor, sold 3 phase $180 on eBay. In the pack rat parts bin a 1 phase magnetic starter hence under $500 a top line compressor above the past years top of the heap compressors (way above Quincy, Kellog American & Curtiss back in their good day), SB still made in the USA plus pressure lubed pump head option.

Soda blast cabinet, paint booth, i'm set at my own DIY repair and machine shop. Aviation and electrical background 49 years meets the requirements keeping a LR running without Stealerships......~~=o&o>.......
 

Mozambique

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Mechanic was able to fix the threads thankfully. Alignment done and now back on the road.
Ride seems a bit firmer. I cheaped out and used Eurospare LCA's. Wonder if bushings are solid rubber or oil filled like OEM........
Clonking all gone thankfully
 

Mozambique

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For those thinking of doing their LCA's, here's a summary of my general experiences:

- In total took around 16hrs, but this involved a lot of fussing around with driving the cv shafts out. I have probably an average aptitude for DYI mechanics FYI.
- Don't forget to lock the suspension in access (lowered) mode before you start, or you will have issues disconnecting / reconnecting the shock absorbers.
- Unless you live in salt-free environment, plan on buying replacement bushing nuts and bolts ahead of time, as you will likely need to cut one or more seized bolts.
- For a 2010 you do need to unseat the cv shafts to get enough clearance to remove the LCA ball joint where it attaches to the knuckle. For later years this is not required. Not sure in which year the design changed.
- LCA's were last done by dealer 42,000 miles ago. They did not use anti-seize on the LCA bolts!!! I live in Toronto, so salty winters. Both front bolts came out fine. Both rear ones seized. The rears are both located adjacent to the cat converters - wonder if heating and cooling causes condensation and rusting?
- Access tight for rear LCA bolt nuts. You can just get a deep 24mm socket on there with a bit of fiddling.
- You will need a 24" breaker bar. I also found a 16" one useful given limited clearance under vehicle.
- Cutting the bolts a pain. Don't even attempt without a Sawzall. Will need plenty of blades. I used ~ a dozen blades just to cut through two out of four bolts.
- Biggest issue was driving cv shafts back through the knuckle. Initially tried a hammer and steel drift. Budged a 1/4", but dinged the thread slightly. Next bought an air hammer and rented a compressor. Used a 1" dia. hammer bit. Was careful but damaged thread further! Correct procedure (thank you Stuart!) is to: i) jack up knuckle 2-3", ii) use a tapered punch bit in air hammer. The pointy end seats in the dimple in the centre of the cv shaft end. No risk of thread damage and the shaft just popped out!
- Fitting the new LCA's straightforward. Took a bit of manhandling to seat properly, but not a problem.
- Don't forget to jack up the knuckle so that here is a 18.3" distance between the centre of the cv shaft and the lip of the fender before you torque the LCA bushing nuts. Otherwise you risk damaging the bushings if you torque the nuts with the suspension unloaded.

............. lastly.......... don't forget to use anti-seize on the new bushing bolts!!!!
 

BeemerNut

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Don't forget anti-seize on the splined half shaft and inside the splined hub before assembly so it can be removed next time without all that pounding on the stub shaft.
This brings up a question after reading hammer and drift besides air impact which is cosidered a hard impact hit now causing a dented wheel bearing race on the inboard race of the pack or bearing cartridge issues later by shortening wheel bearing life. Same reason why you use special tools installing wheel bearing packs or cartridges by only pressing on the outter race with no forces applied to the inner race damaging the new races. This includes hammering on bearings reinstalling the old or new replacement flange drive into the new bearing pack or cartridge.
Sure bet dealer replaced LCA was assembled dry being fast and dirty replacement, "you'll be back" attitude. At only 42K miles sure sucks vs 150 to 250K miles before failures.....~~=o&o>.....
 

Mozambique

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I did not put any anti-seize on the splined shaft after reading the link below:

https://www.knowyourparts.com/techn...arings/lubricating-light-vehicle-axle-shafts/

Apparently the anti-seize or grease may get pushed off the spline as you install the shaft and end up sitting at the end trapped. When you torque the axle nut this can lead to an erroneous result where the lube gets compressed and you think you have torqued correctly. Over time the lube leaks out and you end up with a loose axle shaft and premature wear.
 

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