What tools should i buy to work on my LR4 at home?

Discussion in 'LR4' started by Socialseb83, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. djkaosone

    djkaosone '11 LR4 HSE LUX 5.0L V8

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    The first time I did mine took 3 hours with beer breaks and to swear at the damn thing. After doing my timing chain, the easiest way to remove the spark plugs, ignition coils, etc... is to remove both battery trays completely and it'll take you'll complete the entire job in less than 1 hour. I also used a Milwaukee torque wrench with a flexible 90* extension and T30 bit to speed up the process.
     
  2. Troy Angrignon

    Troy Angrignon Full Access Member

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    ^^THIS. Use Google and Search first. Please respect that while you are new to the vehicle and the community and I certainly appreciate your level of keenness and willingness to learn, many of your questions (and so many threads) would be solved with a quick search.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  3. Socialseb83

    Socialseb83 Full Access Member

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    I will always make the effort to do this, but please know that if I do post, and it IS something that’s been discussed, it’s not because I’m trying to be a dick to anyone and disrespect the rest if the members in any way. You guys have been amazing, as has this community. I most likely genuinely didn't find what i was looking for, or didn't have the time to search through all the previous posts. That being said, i WILL begin my research from now on by looking through the older posts for answers before posting. Thank you for the tip. I know its not easy to say something that you’re afraid might come across harsh, but i know this advice will help me jive better with everyone, so thank u!
     
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  4. Socialseb83

    Socialseb83 Full Access Member

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    Took advantage of XMas sales at Home Depot to get my tools!!! A bunch of Husky tools with Lifetime Warranty at a great price!!! Very excited!!!
     
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  5. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    Edit: Just realized this became a jumbled mess but I'll leave it and maybe find you a job list I did for when I replaced the suspension, brakes, etc.

    Nothing wrong with Husky/Home Depot or Kobalt/Lowes but I would be more careful at Harbor Freight. For example only shop HF during the sales (which is almost all the time but there are a few 'best' times). I have a set of Kobalt impact sockets I use all the time. I most have impact because I can use them either way. Some are ground off at the edge to make a flat face for better fit when needed.

    Support: From there I actually only have floor jacks and big jack stands. So i got 4 of the yellow 24"+ 3ton jacks and 4 of the larger than usual 12k stands that allow setting the frame up at 24".

    Also use a small low profile easy to move around floor jack for maneuvering things or supplemental lifting like the wheel hub or other stuff while adjusting fitting or removal.

    Name brands Snap-On, Proto, Cornwell, Mac: We've all heard of Snap-On and I love every one I have but i also REALLY like the Proto tools I learned about a few yrs ago. You have to research because there are the pure USA made ones and then some that are not. The Proto website can guide you through what is and part numbers to then find the best price elsewhere.

    I also like the set of Cornwell combination wrenches 8-36 in basic black which made them cheap but high grade. I have Mac and Proto too but the Proto are their top line medium offset box and a huge set 6mm-36 or maybe 32. Proto has very good machining and finish. Cornwell, is fine enough, Mac is good too. Snap-On and Proto so far seem equal on the equivalent top line models to be honest.

    So, tool design: There are variations in wrenches, sockets, ratchets, etc not only in material and machining but design such as Snap-On have a half tooth offset for the 12 points in the end of a box wrench. This means that a zero offset can be flipped for each movement if space is super tight (flat, not a bent arm and head like you normally see).

    (offsets: zero= angle of approach is flat and head is in line with face of wrench as opposed to medium or deep offset which will have the arm make a bend, then again at box head. A 10 or 15 degree is like you normally see on a combi wrench where the box head is right at the end of a straight shaft but is then bent about 15 degrees but not really an offset.)

    Higher grade steel allows for a thinner box which in turn means better access to tight spaces. This means nothing until it means everything LOL

    Still in tool design: sockets are not all created equal. There are "thin wall", deep, medium, stubby, impact (black), hand only (chrome) and special that will have an outer hex base shape to allow more flexible access by being able to set it into a box wrench creating an essentially super stubby.

    Ratchets are where I spent $$$ on Snap-On after a lot of handling and also finding you can get rebuild kits and service them. I also compared measurements like thickness of the head and machining fit tolerance of the sockets. Note: Proto sockets are too tight on Snap-On anvils but perfect on Proto ratchet anvils (square drive that goes inside socket).

    Ratchet tool design: Snap-On flex head or locking flex head are my preferred but almost all my sockets are Proto with some specialty in Mac and Snap-On.

    Still under tool design here, not all companies make the same choices. Meaning, you have to research different brands for certain tool shapes or features sometimes. Size ranges can be strange too with one brand not having what you want but another has them all.

    I have 2 tool rolls in the lr3 and a small bag that fits under the front seat (2nd row foot space tucked under the front seat.) With this I can remove/repair the entire suspension or other things below the body and likely most under the hood. Also have a 1/2" long flex head ratchet.

    The car kit has a few choice items lr3 specific such as 1/4 drive flex head extra long arm ratchet with 15mm short socket solely for the back bolt on top of the front air struts. The front two bots are easy with almost any 15mm slight offset box wrench but also for there I have a ratcheting 15mm Proto from the favorite set. (they make THE best version of this wrench but the set is $$$ 6mm-36). The kit has a few others for tight suspension part such as forward upper rear control arm bolt removal and one of the driver side front sway bar bolts. (thin wall 3/8 drive with universal joint and extension).

    Air tools: so many hours of youtube reviews LOL but I learned a lot about actual built up force over time and how the tools perform regardless of on paper. Ultimately i chose Proto for design and balance of the tool and have their 3/4 HD, 1/2 compact and then a cheap brand but highly rated in testing 1/4 drive which is really more for speed as you can't put too much force into a 1/4 drive fitting anyway. Unlike the 32mm wheel hub nut or some of the suspension bolts when rusted.

    Allen/hex keys and torx: Bondhus for any and all hex/allen wrenches. They make the best 15 pc set that includes very rare 9 and 7mm that I've actually used on the rover and on my bikes.

    While on topic of hex and torx, the rovers have some stupid bolts that are "external torx" and even a very rare to me external 5 point. The E torx though is something Snap-On makes and maybe MAC. I'd have to check what part on the car it was, but it was annoying. Might be the drive shafts.

    Best thing to do is pick a project then assess the tools needed. To me a comprehensive set of something is better such as a 1/2 socket deep, impact up to 36 but also a 1/4 drive hand set 6mm-15 and 3/8 8-26.

    Grey Pneumatic has some cool stuff too. I'll try to get a few photos.
     
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  6. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    Slight differences in design

    6E1BED3E-E468-4A86-8594-2EAAFD0A4C59.jpeg

    64C76D1C-EC0C-4A09-B9C3-97CBCAD1DE3F.jpeg
     
  7. jwest

    jwest Full Access Member

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    Examples

    353AB7A6-385A-4E22-8795-755159B8CBD1.jpeg
     
  8. cperez

    cperez Full Access Member

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    Didn't try all of the links but the Mechanic's tool set got me intrigued. It goes to a page with an illustration of the set for $3.20 but it's actually for a set of 17mm Car Chrome Alloy Wheel Bolt Nut Covers Caps For Ford Peugeot Citroen 20Pcs. Trust me, I tried buying the tools for 3 bux but no joy.

    Otherwise, this is a great list as are the other suggestions in this thread.
     
  9. djkaosone

    djkaosone '11 LR4 HSE LUX 5.0L V8

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