Coolant Crossover Pipe Repair 5.0 V8

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RoverTide

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I'm starting to wonder if preventative maintenance is cost effective. On the face of it, that seems like a no-brainer, but reading all these posts makes me start to wonder. I checked out getting the timing chain and water pump and cross over pipes done by a reputable indy that specializes in Land Rovers. They also throw in spark plugs and wires (maybe the coils, can't remember) and the fuel injectors. They quoted me a little shy of $8,000 (but it wouldn't surprise me if it turns out closer to $10,000). Then what happens if the engine blows up anyway?

Right now, the rig runs fine, but I feel like I'm sitting on a ticking time bomb. Would getting all this work done and paying all this money take away that feeling? I'd walk from the whole thing if I paid what was the equivalent of a major repair in preventative maintenance only to have the engine blow up anyway (maybe for some other reason) and find I now have all this sunk preventative maintenance costs AND still need to pay to replace the engine. Maybe I would be better off just driving it and enjoying it and if the engine blows up knowing that it might make more sense to just replace the engine than pay to preventatively maintain the one it has. Sounds crazy, right?

After considering it, I think I've come up with the answer to my own question. If you can't afford to do both (major preventative maintenance and engine replacement) you shouldn't do either. Otherwise, it becomes a "money pit" that you can't afford to dig your way out of.
Honestly, you may be on to something there. From my limited experience it seems the only way preventative maintenance on these things is cost effective is if you can DIY most or all of the work. Otherwise, you're right, its a money pit. I am learning, in all seriousness, that owning one of these is like being in an abusive relationship that no one can figure out why you are still in. You love it, and hope it will change, but you know it probably won't. But at least you have this support group to keep you going.
 

powershift

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I'm starting to wonder if preventative maintenance is cost effective. On the face of it, that seems like a no-brainer, but reading all these posts makes me start to wonder. I checked out getting the timing chain and water pump and cross over pipes done by a reputable indy that specializes in Land Rovers. They also throw in spark plugs and wires (maybe the coils, can't remember) and the fuel injectors. They quoted me a little shy of $8,000 (but it wouldn't surprise me if it turns out closer to $10,000). Then what happens if the engine blows up anyway?

Right now, the rig runs fine, but I feel like I'm sitting on a ticking time bomb. Would getting all this work done and paying all this money take away that feeling? I'd walk from the whole thing if I paid what was the equivalent of a major repair in preventative maintenance only to have the engine blow up anyway (maybe for some other reason) and find I now have all this sunk preventative maintenance costs AND still need to pay to replace the engine. Maybe I would be better off just driving it and enjoying it and if the engine blows up knowing that it might make more sense to just replace the engine than pay to preventatively maintain the one it has. Sounds crazy, right?

After considering it, I think I've come up with the answer to my own question. If you can't afford to do both (major preventative maintenance and engine replacement) you shouldn't do either. Otherwise, it becomes a "money pit" that you can't afford to dig your way out of.

Your engine isn't going to blow up. What is needed is an eye on the coolant level. Check it in the AM before first start periodically, but consistently. I wouldn't do the timing chain unless you can hear it making noise.
I tried getting a quote yesterday for the timing chain work alone at the local Land Rover dealer and he said $1,800 for labor. But he didn't give me the whole quote. I felt like asking if parts were free. I don't trust those guys at all. They don't pickup the phone and cant quote a job. But they have probably 100 or so Land Rovers parked in their lot that are used, not for sale and all parked near the service area.
 

ktm525

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Chasing problems on these are expensive. If something is broken or leaking then I fix it , otherwise I let it be. Has served me well on a 2006 LR3 with 290k kms and a 2010 LR4 with 210k kms. Original tensioners and chains and I don't even own a IID. :)
 

ryanjl

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I do preventative maintenance. I've done it on every vehicle I've owned. Multiple Land Cruisers, Jeeps, and Land Rovers.

I don't find it particularly more expensive than any prior vehicle I've owned, but then again I'm making more money now than I've ever made before so it's all probably relative.

Caveat: I do most of the work myself, but know when to fold them and have someone else do it if it's going to be too much of a PITA, i.e. rear crossover pipe.

And I don't see how not owning a GAP tool and saving money on Land Rover ownership can coexist in the same sentence, but oh well.
 
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dlimanov

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the two killers of these engines are coolant component failures and timing chains (to a lesser degree). not aware of other big instances where engines just blow up. i would absolutely take care of cooling system maintenance proactively.
 

ryanjl

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Easy. Common sense and a forum.
"Common sense and a forum" doesn't help you when a warning light comes on and you can't determine what code it's throwing.

Either that, or yours is clapped out and has a permawarning light on.

I guess now I know why you consider a 10 year old vehicle with 100k miles on it "elderly."
 

ktm525

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Mine (2010) is is great shape with close to 150k miles. Original chains, original air system, one new self installed water pump and one new front crossover. Other than a red overheat light the amber ones are generally not an immediate issue and can be dealt with. 99% of the time it is a dirty MAF, needs a can of BG44k or a new PCV.

My 2006 LR3 with 220k miles is same same, no crossovers done though lol.

I can gaurantee the environment we run them up here is much more harsh than what they deal with down south.
 

powershift

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Heat can be harsh. I'm not brave enough yet to take my LR4 to Death Valley when it is 130F, but I've driven it in 120F heat. When I got the truck the weather was super hot and it looked like the rear crossover sprung a new leak and dripped down on the transmission. I'm curious if the radiator is another fail point or do they typically last longer than 150k? If I recall correctly, they are part plastic which is a new thing for me.
 

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