PCV refresh/replacement

Michael Gain

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As I continue to refresh my truck, I'll keep posting in the hopes that it helps someone else.

I received my gap tool and have been playing with a couple of the tool's capabilities. Simplistically, for this thread, the code reading function.

I had six DTCs: P2187 and P2189 related to a lean condition at idle, two relater to "loss of communication with transfer case control module" (I have the single-speed transfer case), a high signal related to hvac controls, and loss of communication with the headlamp control module.

I tried to find any information on the lean condition and ran across the attached PDF. Based on the information that it contained, I ordered a PCV kit and breather hose off of ebay. I also ordered the intercooler gasket, but it was unneeded.

Screenshot_20190728-145702.png
I did not take pictures during the install, but attached are pics post install.

20190728_133845.jpg
Tools:
-Trim removal tool or similar plastic pry tool
- channel locks
- dental pick
- pliers to bend dental pick into a half loop

Screenshot_20190728-143411.png

Parts:
-LR062601, breather tube (might as well replace it)
- PCV cover, diaphragm, and spring

First, remove the engine cover. The PCV valve is located on the passenger-side valve cover, towards the firewall (look for orange color).

20190728_133907.jpg

Next, remove the breather hose. One end attached above the throttle body, and the other attached to the pcv valve. You can remove the end above the throttle body with your hand. Find the grooved portion of the clip, squeeze while pulling the hose out of the fitting-- easy.

20190728_133949.jpg
 

Michael Gain

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The attachment to the pcv valve will take the majority of your time. The bend in the hose prevents "finger leverage" and you'll need to use the channel locks. Since you have removed the throttle body attachment, you will be able to rotate the hose appropriately to depress the grooved portion of the clip. Once removed from the pcv valve, unclip the vacuum hose, and remove the hose.
20190728_134203.jpg

Removing the hose takes some gymnastics. You can remove the hose attachments to the intercooler, but then you get to play in antifreeze.

20190728_134003.jpg
Instead, remove the vacuum fitting,


20190728_134016.jpg

pull the rubber ignition coil insulator off of its attachment and tuck it underneath the hose. Then, rotate the entire assembly toward the front of the vehicle so that the end that was attached to the pcv valve is standing perpendicular to the vehicle. Then, slide the entire assembly towards the passenger-side air box. The hose will slide underneath the coolant lines to the intercooler and you can remove it.

Now, the pcv valve is exposed in all of its glory. Use your newly formed dental pick to remove four of the six clips. If yours is old / abused like mine was, the tabs will just break off--awesome.

20190728_134058.jpg

The other two clips are located underneath. With four of six clips undone / broken, you can massage the other two off. Use your plastic pry tool to push the rubber insulator (between valve cover and lower intake manifold) underneath the pcv cover.

20190728_133920.jpg

Remove the cover, diaphragm, and spring. As you can see in the picture, my diaphragm is torn and the runner is brittle.

Keep the plastic pry tool handy for install. Put the spring in first, line up the alignment posts on the back of the diaphragm and install first. You will need to push the rubber insulator beneath the pcv body to fully seat the diaphragm. After seating, keep it seated with one hand and grab the pcv cover with the other.

Install the pcv cover and try to lock in the bottom clips first. You may need your plastic trim tool again. Once the bottom clips are seated, apply pressure along the entire circumference of the cover to seat all of the clips.

Once satisfied, swap the vacuum line clip onto the new breather tube and install in the reverse order of removal (I lubricated the new o-rings with clean engine oil prior to install).

Clear any codes, start the car, and check for leaks. Once satisfied, re-install the engine cover, close the hood and call it a day.
 

scott schmerge

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Michael, thanks for the write-up. Assuming this is the 6 cyl supercharged? Looks nothing like my 5.0 v8 but I think it has the same pcv valves on the back valve cover on the passenger side.
 

Michael Gain

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Scott,

Haha, i should have been clear. Yes, it's a 6 cylinder. I'm tracking that it is the same, but the 5.0 has two valves. Probably much better access too!
 

scott schmerge

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Scott,

Haha, i should have been clear. Yes, it's a 6 cylinder. I'm tracking that it is the same, but the 5.0 has two valves. Probably much better access too!

Both are true. They are accessible without moving anything at all! But I’ll take a difficult to access PCV valve over a 19 hour timing chain update any day of the week . Although I wouldn’t trade my V8!

Thanks for the write-up!
 

Michael Gain

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Quick update:

The lean codes came back. I swallowed my pride and took it to the local Indy. I also asked him to look into a ticking sound from the front of the car (water pump failure thread has me paranoid).

The shops verdict is the passenger valve cover is leaking. The PCV valves was a symptom of a defunct functioning of the baffles and whatnot inside the valve cover. They are writing up an estimate for repair.

Maybe it's better to just replace the valve cover instead of the valve diaphragm...
 

scott schmerge

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Quick update:

The lean codes came back. I swallowed my pride and took it to the local Indy. I also asked him to look into a ticking sound from the front of the car (water pump failure thread has me paranoid).

The shops verdict is the passenger valve cover is leaking. The PCV valves was a symptom of a defunct functioning of the baffles and whatnot inside the valve cover. They are writing up an estimate for repair.

Maybe it's better to just replace the valve cover instead of the valve diaphragm...

Sorry to hear. Keep us posted on the verdict/outcome.
 

PaulLR3

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I had a leaking passenger side valve cover as well. They spotted it at 98K when I asked for a complete inspection before the CPO warranty ran out. However, it was leaking oil into the alternator. The tech said they have seen this before and it shortens the lifespan of the alternator. Since it already had 98K miles on it, I paid for a new alternator. Make sure you have the tech see if your valve cover leak was dripping into your alternator.
 

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