maintenance history since new 2013

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ttforcefed

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12/27/2023
$2,812
replace rear calipers
replace power steering pump assembly
4 wheel alignment
oil change
 

ktm525

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when you quote these numbers that includes the price paid for the car?

I account for two costs, I don't include fuel, registration and insurance. Those would be scary numbers

Of the costs I track:

1) Maintenance is everything that was put into or onto the car (parts & labour)
2) General depreciation which includes what I paid and what I could realistically sell for. In my case my current sell price is $7300 US so reasonable.

Two ways these are tracked. Per month and per km

Total Cost per month (main & depreciation) I have owned = $324 Cdn = $240 US/month.

Maintenance = $108 Cdn/month = $81 US/month
 

MRLR4

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I can tell you what I actually paid since I bought the thing, and what I should have paid. Mind you, I've owned this delightful heap of junk for about 2 months, and bought it as a highly maintained car with chains already done. That said, it was a Land Rover, and I knew a lot would go wrong with it. I just didn't anticipate how much.

140,200 miles Within three days the original air pump failed. Known issue was "intermittent" suspension error. It was intermittent, but it became permanent real quick. $65 fix. No, really. Amazon Warehouse random China brand pump. Plus $10 to replace the garbage clay based junk it was filled with for desiccant. It works, for now.

140,220 miles Diagnostic tool from Launch. Does every everything the IID does except for ECM reprogramming and keys. $135.

140,500 Off the car carrier, I could smell I faint odor of coolant. Within weeks this transitioned into coolant on the ground and dumping coolant into. I replaced both crossovers, thermostat, water pump, water pump/oil cooler connector, serpentine belt, and stretch belt. Maybe $350 in parts, plus some extra for tools. Including a few oddball tools and extra parts I didn't need, $500.

140,600 miles: Major failures and won't run. Turns out to be a dirty MAF or throttle body. $30 for cleaners. Or $1000 for parts, but so far unnecessary. Aftermarket MAF replacement attempt did not work.

140, 700 miles: New AGM Battery: $170.

I've bought a bunch of other stuff, but it wasn't maintenance. Now, the total cost to fix all this stuff on a supposedly great condition and well cared for LR4? At least $6000 if I paid a dealer to do it with Rover parts. Probably more. So, I'm into it for about $600 or $6,000, depending on your perspective, in 500 miles. Next on the list is the lower steering shaft, which has now failed. I'm guessing that would be a $1000 dealer job, but it's a $200 part, so that's what it will cost me. So call it $7,000 or $800. However you look at it, it's ridiculous. I haven't even put 1,000 miles on it, and the thing was a cream puff that came with a stack of maintenance records. These things are at an age and a used value where the parts costs are seriously devaluing them because every last thing on them is wholly unreliable. I have owned dozens and dozens of cars, and this is the worst in repairs, bar none. Total failure prone piece of crap from a mechanical perspective. Coulda, woulda, shoulda bought a Jeep or a Toyota. But *IF* it holds together, I'll be money ahead having done the repairs myself. Previous owner also paid for repairs out the nose, or at least his warranty company did. There's a reason I only paid $6500 for a cosmetically perfect vehicle, even with maintenance records, which still must have been more than dealer trade. Dealers don't want the time bomb either. I would never, ever recommend that anyone buy one of these dumpster fires unless they know how to spin wrenches and are willing to put on crappy Chinese parts. The cost of many OEM parts is obscene. Fabulous when it works, though!
 

ugmw177

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wow, interesting things breaking on your LR4: lower steering shaft? not common, i dont think. You are correct, parts [OE] are kind of expensive but some of the chineseuim stuff is just crap; even it is my lobor, this beast is enough trouble to work on that i dont want to do many of the things twice.
 

ftillier

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The U-joint can seize up in the lower steering shaft. Just had to do that, it's not too hard, some of the access it pretty tight so getting things torqued can be challenging.
 

powershift

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I can tell you what I actually paid since I bought the thing, and what I should have paid. Mind you, I've owned this delightful heap of junk for about 2 months, and bought it as a highly maintained car with chains already done. That said, it was a Land Rover, and I knew a lot would go wrong with it. I just didn't anticipate how much.

140,200 miles Within three days the original air pump failed. Known issue was "intermittent" suspension error. It was intermittent, but it became permanent real quick. $65 fix. No, really. Amazon Warehouse random China brand pump. Plus $10 to replace the garbage clay based junk it was filled with for desiccant. It works, for now.

140,220 miles Diagnostic tool from Launch. Does every everything the IID does except for ECM reprogramming and keys. $135.

140,500 Off the car carrier, I could smell I faint odor of coolant. Within weeks this transitioned into coolant on the ground and dumping coolant into. I replaced both crossovers, thermostat, water pump, water pump/oil cooler connector, serpentine belt, and stretch belt. Maybe $350 in parts, plus some extra for tools. Including a few oddball tools and extra parts I didn't need, $500.

140,600 miles: Major failures and won't run. Turns out to be a dirty MAF or throttle body. $30 for cleaners. Or $1000 for parts, but so far unnecessary. Aftermarket MAF replacement attempt did not work.

140, 700 miles: New AGM Battery: $170.

I've bought a bunch of other stuff, but it wasn't maintenance. Now, the total cost to fix all this stuff on a supposedly great condition and well cared for LR4? At least $6000 if I paid a dealer to do it with Rover parts. Probably more. So, I'm into it for about $600 or $6,000, depending on your perspective, in 500 miles. Next on the list is the lower steering shaft, which has now failed. I'm guessing that would be a $1000 dealer job, but it's a $200 part, so that's what it will cost me. So call it $7,000 or $800. However you look at it, it's ridiculous. I haven't even put 1,000 miles on it, and the thing was a cream puff that came with a stack of maintenance records. These things are at an age and a used value where the parts costs are seriously devaluing them because every last thing on them is wholly unreliable. I have owned dozens and dozens of cars, and this is the worst in repairs, bar none. Total failure prone piece of crap from a mechanical perspective. Coulda, woulda, shoulda bought a Jeep or a Toyota. But *IF* it holds together, I'll be money ahead having done the repairs myself. Previous owner also paid for repairs out the nose, or at least his warranty company did. There's a reason I only paid $6500 for a cosmetically perfect vehicle, even with maintenance records, which still must have been more than dealer trade. Dealers don't want the time bomb either. I would never, ever recommend that anyone buy one of these dumpster fires unless they know how to spin wrenches and are willing to put on crappy Chinese parts. The cost of many OEM parts is obscene. Fabulous when it works, though!

What are the symptoms you are getting from the lower steering shaft?
 

f1racer328

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Coulda, woulda, shoulda bought a Jeep or a Toyota.

Ehh, goes both ways.

My mom just bought a 2013 Jeep. Has great maintenance records, super clean inside and out, 120k miles.

Already have replaced the transfer case fluid (had a clunk, and this resolves it) the AC low pressure refrigerant line was leaking, and now it needs a water pump + radiator hoses...
 

itsaguything

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I can tell you what I actually paid since I bought the thing, and what I should have paid. Mind you, I've owned this delightful heap of junk for about 2 months, and bought it as a highly maintained car with chains already done. That said, it was a Land Rover, and I knew a lot would go wrong with it. I just didn't anticipate how much.

140,200 miles Within three days the original air pump failed. Known issue was "intermittent" suspension error. It was intermittent, but it became permanent real quick. $65 fix. No, really. Amazon Warehouse random China brand pump. Plus $10 to replace the garbage clay based junk it was filled with for desiccant. It works, for now.

140,220 miles Diagnostic tool from Launch. Does every everything the IID does except for ECM reprogramming and keys. $135.

140,500 Off the car carrier, I could smell I faint odor of coolant. Within weeks this transitioned into coolant on the ground and dumping coolant into. I replaced both crossovers, thermostat, water pump, water pump/oil cooler connector, serpentine belt, and stretch belt. Maybe $350 in parts, plus some extra for tools. Including a few oddball tools and extra parts I didn't need, $500.

140,600 miles: Major failures and won't run. Turns out to be a dirty MAF or throttle body. $30 for cleaners. Or $1000 for parts, but so far unnecessary. Aftermarket MAF replacement attempt did not work.

140, 700 miles: New AGM Battery: $170.

I've bought a bunch of other stuff, but it wasn't maintenance. Now, the total cost to fix all this stuff on a supposedly great condition and well cared for LR4? At least $6000 if I paid a dealer to do it with Rover parts. Probably more. So, I'm into it for about $600 or $6,000, depending on your perspective, in 500 miles. Next on the list is the lower steering shaft, which has now failed. I'm guessing that would be a $1000 dealer job, but it's a $200 part, so that's what it will cost me. So call it $7,000 or $800. However you look at it, it's ridiculous. I haven't even put 1,000 miles on it, and the thing was a cream puff that came with a stack of maintenance records. These things are at an age and a used value where the parts costs are seriously devaluing them because every last thing on them is wholly unreliable. I have owned dozens and dozens of cars, and this is the worst in repairs, bar none. Total failure prone piece of crap from a mechanical perspective. Coulda, woulda, shoulda bought a Jeep or a Toyota. But *IF* it holds together, I'll be money ahead having done the repairs myself. Previous owner also paid for repairs out the nose, or at least his warranty company did. There's a reason I only paid $6500 for a cosmetically perfect vehicle, even with maintenance records, which still must have been more than dealer trade. Dealers don't want the time bomb either. I would never, ever recommend that anyone buy one of these dumpster fires unless they know how to spin wrenches and are willing to put on crapp
@MRLR4,

I’m afraid to expose the obvious…. I’m not sure you have a well “maintained“ vehicle. And the $6500 price tag should have been a warning bell.

I think its more along the lines that scheduled maintenance was ignored and it only went into the shop when there was a failure. That’s not maintenance to me.

And to be fair, replacing batteries is routine maintenance.
As is cleaning MAFs and throttle bodies
As is replacing ALL fluids at 50k intervals and oil at 5k intervals.
As is changing the coolant lines among other major disposable components at 100k.

The owners manual clearly lays out the best practices on using the air suspension. Too bad for you the previous owner ignored that. And so you got to replace the worn out pump.

And as you’re at 140k, ( and what year is your vehicle?) if the plugs, injectors, all driveline fluids, including transmission… weren’t changed, you have bigger component charges coming.
Were the brakes maintained? Some don’t perform a routine maintenance on a multi ton vehicle.
Was the power steering fluid changed… and reservoir? That hydraulic system gets a lot of use.
Were all the suspension linkages maintained?? Probably the number 2 reason many dump the vehicle. Wait til you see that bill.

Moreover, From a different point of view, I’m done sending money China’s way. But I do like the term Chinesium Crap, @ugmw177 ! You get what you pay for is a lesson I taught my children…

Cheers
 
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powershift

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I haven't replaced my injectors at 101k mi. They seem to be working just fine.
 

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