Need advice from someone with offroad LR4 experience

Discussion in 'LR4' started by Socialseb83, Oct 3, 2019.

  1. Steve T

    Steve T Active Member

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    Where can you get these? I am looking for sliders tats do that and have come up empty...
     
  2. ryanjl

    ryanjl Full Access Member

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    TR = Tactical Rover or Tactical 4x4.

    You can get them on their website or from Lucky 8. Lucky 8 also has their Proud Rhino sliders, which are similar.
     
  3. RobRover88

    RobRover88 Active Member

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    RE Sliders & compressor guard etc. Earlier this year I had sliders, comp. guard & air-tank guard, plus a
    beautifully designed & fabricated transmission & transfer case guard, all produced & fitted by
    APT Offroad in Brisbane Australia. They design & build in-house all their protection gear & it's all great gear. The sliders are strong enough to take the entire weight of the vehicle. I drove 1000 miles from home to get Ben at APT to personally do the fitting. A beautiful job too!!
    He told me he sells more gear to U.S. customers than Aussies. He said with the current exchange rate his
    customers seem very happy.
    He made a steel step-top for my sliders with cut-outs rather than checkerplate. I'd suggest everyone
    should check out his brilliant YouTube videos featuring all of their protection gear. They're worth watching
    purely for the entertainment value - very prefessional!! aptoffroad.com.au
     
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  4. backroadnomad

    backroadnomad Member

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    Weight is weight, especially when it's rotational weight. I will admit, the D3/4 being as heavy as it it, it may not be as big of a factor as on lighter vehicles. I came from performance street driving where you do literally feel that extra pound on the axle (two or three pounds is more realistic for most spacers). I probably should have stressed the quality of the spacer more than the weight for these heavy trucks, but I still can't in good conscience recommend a spacer. It's a crappy mod that is only done out of not spending the money to do it properly (new wheels). And all that said, you make a very valid point on the E rated tires. Those certainly make the biggest difference, but why add to the issue?

    You're technically right on the locker, however for 95% of what these Rovers were designed to traverse, the traction control is sufficient. Yes, lockers will do it slower and sometimes better, but for someone new to all this like the OP seems to be, it's just as much a huge risk of failure. Tons of added stress on components with a locker, and you better know what you're doing. I'm not opposed to them at all, but I always HIGHLY dissuade newbies from installing a locker. Gain experience. Know the truck well. Then install one if still needed. And don't bring the D2 into this discussion. Its traction system absolutely sucks in comparison to the 3/4.
     
  5. avslash

    avslash Full Access Member

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    I'm considering relocating my front locker switch to a hidden location for just that reason.

    I worry about some set of circumstances that puts someone else behind that wheel that wonders "what does this switch do?"

    Oh, leave a trail of broken front end parts and oil, that what it does....
     
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  6. Troy Angrignon

    Troy Angrignon Member

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    I feel your pain in this question. I wrestled with this on my first build. Now that I'm on my third, my answers have changed (radically). By my fifth build I'm sure it will change again. But here is my advice for what it's worth.

    1. 18" wheels and tires no bigger than 31" (2" larger diameter than stock). You want the 18s in order to get the largest possible sidewall and you don't (generally) want to go larger than 31 initially so that you can still fit a full size spare in the underside wheel storage space AND you don't reduce your gas mileage, put too much stress on the suspension components from things being off-camber, high-angle, and you don't negatively impact the power curve that was engineered for this truck (larger tires means the factory gearing is now sub-optimal.)
    2. Shovel and Maxtrax
    3. Axe
    4. First Aid Kit and First aid training
    5. Base recovery kit (gloves, tow strap (not snatch strap), bow shackles, gloves)
    6. Get some basic recovery / tow / winching training (even though you don't have a winch, you should know how to safely recover your truck)
    7. Driver training (go to Land Rover Experience or Overland Expo and train with the 7P guys).
    8. IID Tool
    9. Maybe the sliders

    Spend less on hardware, and more on software (meaning, training for you and your co-driver).

    Once you're trained and have done trips, you'll know what else you want to add to the truck. But everything you add, reduces the total payload capacity available for people, food, and gear so be careful about adding weight fast. Bumpers in particular are very heavy and will impact the mileage and handling.
     
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  7. HarryO

    HarryO Member

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    Agree about no need for diff locker save the $$$ - let the traction control work. Look at this video:

    https://www.disco3.co.uk/forum/traction-control-video-182193.html

    Best thing is to learn how to drive you LR3/4 (computer on wheels) seems counter intuitive but sometimes you need to let the wheels slip for what feels like ages just to let the traction control kick in.
     
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  8. Izzyandsue

    Izzyandsue Full Access Member

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    I would suggest the original advise you got it not accurate. Sliders and tires, sure. The rest, wait until you can see what your stock LR2 can do, which is a lot. And you can get that in TX from the best one there, Joey Pitts at his 4WD Training School. Brilliant trainer, certified, and a LR enthusiast.

    The best modification you can do is the "nut behind the wheel", and you will be very impressed with a stock capability of the LR4.

    https://www.pitts4x4co.com/
     
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  9. Troy Angrignon

    Troy Angrignon Member

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    I like that quote. Pretty funny.

    Definitely training and getting out there DOING matter more than tacking a bunch of crap onto your vehicle.
     
  10. Socialseb83

    Socialseb83 Member

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    Ok sounds good. But i do need the tires. The LR4 i bought has these tires that have basically NO tread. Not for any sort of off-roading anyway. They’re like highway tires. so here’s the question. Do i wait and spend 3000 on wheels and tires (18” steel with ko2s plus install) or do i pay $1k and get Goodyear Duratracs 255/55R19
     

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